uav - Coordinated Control of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles by...

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Unformatted text preview: Coordinated Control of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles by Peter Joseph Seiler B.S. (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) 1996 B.S. (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) 1996 A dissertation submitted in partial satisfaction of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Engineering-Mechanical Engineering in the GRADUATE DIVISION of the UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY Committee in charge: Professor J.K. Hedrick, Chair Professor Raja Sengupta Professor Andrew Packard Fall 2001 The dissertation of Peter Joseph Seiler is approved: Chair Date Date Date University of California, Berkeley Fall 2001 Coordinated Control of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Copyright Fall 2001 by Peter Joseph Seiler 1 Abstract Coordinated Control of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles by Peter Joseph Seiler Doctor of Philosophy in Engineering-Mechanical Engineering University of California, Berkeley Professor J.K. Hedrick, Chair This thesis considers the problem of coordinated control of unmanned aerial ve- hicles (UAVs). This problem has recently received significant attention in the controls community due to its numerous applications. To realize the benefits of advanced UAV sys- tems, we must build hierarchically from simple to complex tasks. The focus of this thesis is one step in this process: formation flight. This problem is interesting in its own right and leads to several scientific questions. Consider two possible distributed control architectures. First, each vehicle could use a control law that depends on measurements from all vehicles in the formation. This architecture allows us to design centralized controllers but requires the vehicles to commu- nicate large amounts of information. Alternatively, we could design a distributed control architecture where each vehicle uses only sensor information about neighboring vehicles. This architecture does not require communication, but it may lead to disturbance propaga- 2 tion. Specifically, disturbances acting on one vehicle will propagate and, if amplified, may have a large effect on another vehicle. This amplification of disturbances is commonly called string instability. It is clear that formation flight requires basic research into the areas of distributed control, disturbance propagation, and control over communication channels. This thesis makes advances in each of these areas with application to the formation flight problem. In a simple manner, we show that several strategies that do not require communication tend to be string unstable. This result motivates a control design procedure for formation flight that requires communicated leader information. We then determine how often this information must be communicated for acceptable control. We find theoretical bounds on network performance for a simple vehicle following problem. We also develop tools to determine how often information must be communicated in more general networked control systems. The main tool of interest is a computationally tractable method to find thecontrol systems....
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uav - Coordinated Control of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles by...

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