letter - to us through natural law, but through the moral...

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Joshua Ingmire May 30, 2009 John Locke Dear Esteemed Sir, I am a novice to the art of philosophy and have recently begun reading some of your philosophies on natural law and divine law. You wrote “lack of a common judge, with authority, puts all persons in a state of nature”, but one cannot assume that there is naturally authority or common judge. The laws of nature do not always govern the minds of men. It could be said that naturally a man will know to love a woman, and a woman to love a man, without being told to do so by God. The guidance and divine law that is assigned to us by God governs the moral code by which we should live. Life, liberty, and other rights that are presumed free, are in fact not given
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Unformatted text preview: to us through natural law, but through the moral code consigned to us. Though we can agree that freedoms and kindnesses should be possessed a given without instruction. If all or most of mankinds behavior was conducive to your claims of natural rights by natural law, I could see myself agreeing with your point of view and philosophy, but in fact that is not the case. Man, by nature, is not kind; is not charitable; is not naturally good. Most of those who are walking the path that leads to your perception of what are natural rights and laws are usually indeed walking the moral path of divine law, given by God. Joshua Ingmire Philosophy Student Yours sincerely, < Your Signature >...
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letter - to us through natural law, but through the moral...

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