Checkpoint Reading and Comprehension

Checkpoint Reading and Comprehension - retaining the...

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8 Secrets notables: Leaving the comedy at home… At least they mentioned its okay to “throw in a few cuff laughs”, but I believe humor can be a hot button for most people. Props: It’s a great idea to make use of little things. The cooking timer is a great example. Don’t outsmart your audience. Body language is key. Coming into this exercise, I’m always excited to try out exercises like this and see the results. I’ve always been a fast reader, so I anticipated the outcome. Music was playing in the background, and I even slightly heard a conversation from another room. Distractions are always expected, as in golf. I knew the music was playing before I started, so it wasn’t really a distraction at all. I’ve always been one to tolerate things like that the same as if I were in a crowded room. I tried to stay deeply focused enough to read as fast as possible while still
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Unformatted text preview: retaining the information. Honestly, the passage managed to grab my attention and had me involved a bit more personally than I had originally intended. As a father, I could see myself in a situation mentioned in the reading. The closest reading purpose I can say I utilized would be #3, for practical application. I wanted to see how fast I could read at this point. I ended up finishing the passage in one minute and ten seconds. I was intrigued to finally know the formula for calculating ones reading speed. Some Vocabulary: Convocation: A formal assembly at a college or university, especially for a graduation ceremony. Pecuniary: Relating to money. Appellate: Of or pertaining to appeals. Exogenous: Originating from outside; derived externally....
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This note was uploaded on 05/25/2010 for the course IT 205 taught by Professor Kurts during the Spring '08 term at University of Phoenix.

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