chapter11_cq--LV

chapter11_cq--LV - Principles of Comparative Politics...

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Chapter 11: Parliamentary, Presidential, & Mixed Democracies Principles of Comparative Politics
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Classifying Types of Democracy Democracies can be classified into three types: 1. Presidential 2. Parliamentary 3. Mixed Whether a democracy is parliamentary, presidential, or mixed depends on the relationship between: the government the legislature the president (if there is one)
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Classifying Types of Democracy Is the government responsible to the elected legislature? If no, then the democracy is presidential. If yes, then the democracy is either parliamentary or mixed. Vote of no confidence .
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Classifying Types of Democracy Vote of no confidence is initiated by the legislature; Constructive vote of no confidence Who replaces the government? Vote of confidence
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Classifying Types of Democracy A lost vote of no confidence New government without an election ( Italy, Denmark ). Triggers a new election ( Ireland ).
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Classifying Types of Democracy Constructive Vote of No Confidence In Germany, when you propose a confidence motion you must also specify a government alternative. The Weimar Republic
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Classifying Types of Democracy Is there an independently (directly or indirectly) elected president? An independently elected president is a necessary but not a sufficient condition for a presidential regime. Italy and Germany have indirectly elected presidents Austria and Ireland have directly elected presidents If there is no independently elected president, then the regime is parliamentary.
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Classifying Types of Democracy Is the government responsible to the president? If no, then the regime is parliamentary. If yes, then the regime is mixed (assuming legislative responsibility). Presidential responsibility the president to dismiss the government and individual ministers (Portugal) to dissolve the legislature (France).
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What Distinguishes Them? A presidential democracy is one in which the government does not depend on a legislative majority to exist. A parliamentary democracy is one in which the government depends only on a legislative majority to exist. A mixed democracy is one in which the government depends on a legislative majority and on an independently elected president to exist.
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Making and Breaking Governments: Parliamentary Democracies
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A parliamentary democracy is one in which the government depends only on a legislative majority to exist. The government comprises a prime minister and the cabinet. The prime minister is the political chief executive and head of the government. The cabinet is composed of ministers whose job it is to be in the cabinet and head the various government departments. In a parliamentary democracy, the executive branch and the
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This note was uploaded on 05/25/2010 for the course POSC 15 taught by Professor Indrig during the Spring '10 term at UC Riverside.

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chapter11_cq--LV - Principles of Comparative Politics...

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