chapter12_cq--C_1

chapter12_cq--C_1 - Principles of Comparative Politics...

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Chapter 12: Elections and Electoral Systems Principles of Comparative  Politics
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Classifying Democracies Democracies are sometimes classified in terms of the electoral system that they employ. An electoral system is a set of laws that regulate electoral competition between candidates or parties or both.
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Elections: An Overview Virtually every independent country in the world has held elections at one time or another. Only 6 countries had not held legislative or presidential elections by 2007 Bhutan, Brunei, China, Eritrea, Qatar, and Saudi Arabia. Why would dictatorships hold elections?
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Elections: An Overview
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Elections: An Overview
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Electoral Systems Political scientists typically distinguish between electoral systems based on the electoral formula that they employ. Majoritarian Proportional Mixed An electoral formula determines how votes are translated into seats.
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Majoritarian Electoral Systems A majoritarian electoral system is one in which the candidates or parties that receive the most votes win.
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SMDP Systems A single-member district plurality (SMDP) system is one in which individuals cast a single vote for a candidate in a single-member district. The candidate with the most votes wins. Examples: United Kingdom, India, Canada, Nigeria, Zambia
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SMDP Systems
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Alternative Vote The alternative vote is a system of preferential voting. Preferential voting involves voters ranking one or more candidates or parties in order of preference on the ballots.
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Alternative Vote The alternative vote , used in single-member districts, is an electoral system in which voters mark their preferences by rank ordering the candidates. A candidate who receives an absolute majority is elected. If no candidate wins an absolute majority, then the candidate with the fewest votes is eliminated and her votes are reallocated until one candidate has an absolute majroity of the valid votes remaining. Example: Legislative elections in Australia and Fiji.
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First Count Stan Gibbs 4,346 6.3 Neville Newell 18,423 26.7 Gavin Baillie 187 0.3 Alan Sims 1,032 1.5 Ian Paterson 445 0.6 Dudley Leggett 279 0.4 Charles Blunt 28,257 40.9 Helen Caldicott 16,072 23.3 Alternative Vote: Richmond, NSW 1990 Now redistribute 187 votes of Baillie
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First Count Second Count Stan Gibbs 4,346 6.3 4,380 6.3 Neville Newell 18,423 26.7 18,467 26.7 Gavin Baillie 187 0.3 Alan Sims 1,032 1.5 1,053 1.5 Ian Paterson 445 0.6 480 0.7 Dudley Leggett 279 0.4 294 0.4 Charles Blunt 28,257 40.9 28,274 41 Helen Caldicott 16,072 23.3 16,091 23.3 Alternative Vote: Richmond, NSW 1990 Now redistribute 294 votes of Leggett
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Second Count Third Count Stan Gibbs 4,346 6.3 4,380 6.3 4,420 6.4 Neville Newell 18,423 26.7 18,467 26.7 18,484 26.8 Gavin Baillie 187 0.3 Alan Sims 1,032 1.5 1,053 1.5 1,059 1.5 Ian Paterson 445 0.6 480 0.7 530 0.8 Dudley Leggett 279 0.4 294 0.4 Charles Blunt 28,257 40.9 28,274 41 28,303 41 Helen Caldicott 16,072
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This note was uploaded on 05/25/2010 for the course POSC 15 taught by Professor Indrig during the Spring '10 term at UC Riverside.

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chapter12_cq--C_1 - Principles of Comparative Politics...

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