RelativeMotion - Tam 212 Rectilinear Relative Motion 3...

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Tam 212 Rectilinear Relative Motion 3 September, 2004 While the problem of relative motion is considered in more generality in later chapters, with consideration given to rotating coordinate systems, here we discuss the special case of the kinematics of the motions of points as viewed from frames of reference which are not rotating, but may be moving relative to one and other. Consider a point P, an absolute origin O, and a potentially moving origin Q Vector addition tells us Taking a time derivative of this gives or, the velocity of P is the velocity that P has relative to an origin at Q, plus the velocity that Q has. Similarly,
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This result is not very deep, but a reliance on intuiting yourself through problems of relative motion often leads to errors. A student is well advised to set up these equations formally. Application in 1-dimension: Consider a box on the back of a truck. The truck has coordinate x T , the box has absolute coordinate x B and coordinate relative to the truck of u.
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RelativeMotion - Tam 212 Rectilinear Relative Motion 3...

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