Systems_Biology_2009_Lesson_1

Systems_Biology_2009_Lesson_1 - Systems Biology Prof....

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Systems Biology Prof. Hilson Academic year 2009 - 2010 1 Systems Biology 1. Introduction to Systems Biology Prof. Pierre Hilson VIB Department of Plant Systems Biology University of Ghent Academic year 2009-2010 - Biological systems are complex Outline Biological systems are complex - From reduction to integration - Modeling - Multiple scales - Emerging properties - A paradigm in the life sciences
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Systems Biology Prof. Hilson Academic year 2009 - 2010 2 Molecules in a eukaryotic cell Genome Transcripts Various measures of biocomplexity size: 10 3 to 10 9 bases; gene #: a few (virus) to 10 4 total #: 10 8 ; # different copies: 3x10 5 Proteins Metabolites Cells in an organism Human total #: 10 10 ; different copies: 10 4 self cell #: 10 14 ; non self cell #: 2x10 15 total #: 2x10 5 to 10 6 in primary metabolism Neuronal connections C. elegans total #: 10 14 959 in adult hermaphrodite, 1031 in adult male
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Systems Biology Prof. Hilson Academic year 2009 - 2010 3 Today, there is no general theory of the biological systems. - Biological systems are complex Outline Biological systems are complex - From reduction to integration - Modeling - Multiple scales - Emerging properties - A paradigm in the life sciences
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Systems Biology Prof. Hilson Academic year 2009 - 2010 4 1 gene = 1 enzyme = 1 function gene/protein Molecular Biology 60s to mid 80s pathway Molecular Genetics since mid 80s Systems Biology - Integrative Components Biology - Reductionist network Systems Biology since mid 90s
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Systems Biology Prof. Hilson Academic year 2009 - 2010 5 Systems understanding needs a biological atlas of functional maps. Vidal (2001) Vertical versus horizontal view point Vidal (2001)
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Systems Biology Prof. Hilson Academic year 2009 - 2010 6 A horizontal view point to genome expression ¤ A functional genomics project can be seen as a mapping project with a two-dimensional matrix – One axis corresponds to all genes of an organism The othe axis represents a set of conditions to which the organism is The other axis represents exposed • various mutant backgrounds • Experimental conditions ¤ Example: Transcriptome map Genes Genes 1 2 3 4 5 n “Conditions” Vidal (2001) Functional maps or “-omes” ORFeome Genes or proteins Genes 1 2 3 4 5 n “Conditions” Phenome Transcriptome DNA Interactome Expression profiles Transcriptional regulation Mutational phenotypes Cellular, tissue location Interactome Localizome Protein interactions Proteome proteins After Vidal (2001)
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Systems Biology Prof. Hilson Academic year 2009 - 2010 7 Integration of functional maps
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This note was uploaded on 05/28/2010 for the course WE BIBI010000 taught by Professor Marnikvuylsteke during the Spring '10 term at Ghent University.

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Systems_Biology_2009_Lesson_1 - Systems Biology Prof....

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