Scott_1999 - Abstract The label"magnet hospitals" originally was given to a group of U.S hospitals that were able to successfully recruit

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Unformatted text preview: Abstract The label "magnet hospitals" originally was given to a group of U.S. hospitals that were able to successfully recruit and retain professional nurses during a national nursing shortage in the early 1980s. Studies of magnet hospitals illuminated the leadership characteristics and professional practice attributes of nurses within these organizations. Recent investigations within magnet hospitals document significant relationships between nursing and patient outcomes, including mortality and patient satisfaction. The purpose of this review is to: 1) synthesize the magnet hospital research that describes and evaluates the professional practice of nurses within these institutions and (2) identify areas for future research to advance professional nursing models within current hospital organizations. During the national nursing shortage in the 1980s, a group of hospitals had no difficulty in providing adequate staffing of professional nurses at a time when most institutions were challenged to do so. These hospitals were designated as "magnets" because of their ability to successfully attract and retain professional nurses when most hospitals throughout the country were having difficulty achieving that standard. Subsequent research conducted within these magnet hospitals produced a body of knowledge that illuminated the professional nursing practice of nurse administrators and staff members. 2-6 Visibility and staff support were reported as important and effective traits of magnet hospital nurse leaders. Among the most important elements of clinical nursing practice were autonomy within clinical practice, status within the organization, and collaboration. Participative management and support of professional development were traits shared in magnet hospital environments. These research findings offer current relevancy because they describe the essential characteristics of professional nursing and the impact of nursing on patient and organizational outcomes. 7,8 The "Magnetism" of Successful Nursing Organizations Full Text Review of Magnet Hospital Research: Findings and Implications for Professional Nursing Practice ISSN: 0002-0443 Accession: 00005110-199901000-00003 Author(s): Scott, Joan Gleason MA, RN; Sochalski, Julie PhD; Aiken, Linda PhD Issue: Volume 29(1), January 1999, pp 9-19 Publication Type: [Articles] Publisher: © 1999 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc. Institution(s): Joan Gleason Scott, MA, RN, Doctoral Candidate, e-mail: [email protected], School of Nursing, Julie Sochalski, PhD, Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, Assistant Director, Center for Health Services and Policy Research, Linda Aiken, PhD, Trustee Professor of Nursing and Professor of Sociology, Fellow, Leonard Davis Institute, Director, Center for Health Services and Policy Research, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia....
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This note was uploaded on 05/30/2010 for the course GE DZMBGS0100 taught by Professor Sofieverhaeghe during the Spring '10 term at Ghent University.

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Scott_1999 - Abstract The label"magnet hospitals" originally was given to a group of U.S hospitals that were able to successfully recruit

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