102G - CN17 - Definitions of Terms Central to an Argument

102G - CN17 - Definitions of Terms Central to an Argument -...

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Unformatted text preview: Cn17 102G Composing an Argument : Definition of Terms Central to an Argument Beginnings and Endings as Invitations Administrative □ No class on Monday, May 31 □ 22s and 32s □ I’ll have the prompt on Wednesday – or sooner □ Reading for Wednesday, Gordon Harvey’s “Counter-Argument,” is available on our SmartSite in Resources|Pompts and Readings □ Nature & Culture… Review □ Comments on Wednesday’s class discussion? □ JM o “simple” and easy” aren’t the same things o The importance of intellectual self-confidence in drawing comparisons and contrasts. Also true for such other forms of explanation as: Process analysis: how did so many members of the working class come to view the environmental movement as a threat to their livelihoods? Cause-and-effect analysis: If the BP deep-sea oil well failure is the effect, what are its cause s? (direct or immediate cause v. ultimate cause) • Remember that those who offer atypical examples can intend to mislead/persuade on the basis of emotion primarily or exclusively • Similarly, those who offer a single cause for an important event are often ideologues rather than committed to increased understanding Definition: how do you define “elitist?”...
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102G - CN17 - Definitions of Terms Central to an Argument -...

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