Exercise2 PSC41(2)

Exercise2 PSC41(2) - PSC41 Winter 2010 Research Methods...

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PSC41 Winter 2010 Research Methods Exercise 2: Identifying Variables and Operational Definitions In this exercise, you will practice identifying variables and their measurement in descriptions of research studies. So that you get to know more about my field of study, I picked three studies that I have conducted during my PhD program. Based on the descriptions provided below, you are asked to: 1) Identify the independent (IV) and dependent (DV) variables in the study. a. In some cases, there may not be true independent variables. Identify those situations and explain why the apparent IVs are not true IVs. 2) Indicate the levels of the independent variable. 3) Identify how the variables were operationally defined. a. If operational definitions are not been provided, provide your own operational definitions (make sure it is appropriate for the research described). Provide your answers on the ANSWER sheet located at the bottom of this document. When you have completed the exercise, PRINT out the answer sheet and bring it to class NO LATER than TUESDAY January 26th. STUDY #1 Ghetti, S., & Castelli, P. (2006). Developmental differences in false-event rejection: Effects of memorability-based warnings. Memory, 14 , 762-776. The memorability-based strategy is a metacognitive process through which individuals reject (i.e., say “it didn’t happen’) the occurrence of false events if: a) they do not remember the event and b) they expect the event to be highly memorable. Previous research found that only children 9-year-olds and older spontaneously use this strategy. The present study examined whether providing information on strategy use (i.e., “This event is something you should really remember; if you don’t remember it, maybe it didn’t happen”) would improve even younger children’s ability to identify and reject high-memorability false events. Children aged 5, 7, and 9 (n = 144) were asked about true and false (high- and low-memorability)
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This note was uploaded on 06/02/2010 for the course PSC 78918 taught by Professor Dawnteearly during the Winter '09 term at UC Davis.

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Exercise2 PSC41(2) - PSC41 Winter 2010 Research Methods...

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