Comma Rules

Comma Rules - When to use commas: After introductory...

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When to use commas : After introductory phrases of more than three or four words, including participial phrases and infinitive phrases o Disgusted by their taste, the witch refused to eat the children. o To scare them away, she cackled like a crazy person. After an introductory dependent clause signaled by a subordinating conjunction o As long as it’s sunny outside, I will wear sunscreen. To set off contrasts o In most American cities, owning a car is a necessity, not a luxury. o I like to eat soup in the hottest days of summer, not in the winter. After conjunctive adverbs , interrupters such as consequently, however, therefore, nevertheless o Therefore, Butler argues that gender is performed. o I, however, think that salty snacks are better than sweet snacks. o Nevertheless, I will provide both kinds of snacks for my guests. To set off other interrupting phrases o The prince intends, predictably, to save the princess. To set off
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This note was uploaded on 06/02/2010 for the course UWP 1 taught by Professor Braun during the Spring '08 term at UC Davis.

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Comma Rules - When to use commas: After introductory...

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