Documenting_Sources - Documenting Sources Why do...

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Documenting Sources Why do researchers document their sources? It might be easier for you to accept the concept of documenting sources if you think about the research metaphor that compares research to conversation. Remember it? Now, imagine that you are one such interlocutor who has entered the parlor, joined a group, and now says to his listeners: - “I know that Peter Brown believes Theory A is better in terms of how quickly we can arrive at a solution. However, I believe that what is important is not how fast we reach a solution, but rather the quality of solution we find. Therefore, I believe we should replace Theory A with my theory, Theory B, which emphasizes the quality of solution we are able to locate at any time.” - “Surely, this is an interesting point, my dear friend, but Peter Brown rests his Theory A on important insights which state that very often finding any plausible solution within our life-span is difficult enough. Therefore, you must agree, its quality must be of secondary importance. If you talk to Brenda O’Sullivan, Malcolm Foster, or Judy Beverley you will quickly see what I mean.” - “Ha! But my friend, Theory B does not discard the findings of O’Sullivan, Foster, and Beverley. On the contrary, it explores more similar studies by Neverly and Chung. The conclusion which I draw, however, states that we should now concentrate on ways to
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Documenting_Sources - Documenting Sources Why do...

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