Chapter 3 and 4 - Chapter 3 Hearing vs Listening Hearing a...

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Chapter 3
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Hearing vs. Listening Hearing : a sensory process in which sound  waves are transmitted to the brain and someone  becomes conscious of sound. Listening:  A mental operation involving  processing sound waves, interpretation their  meaning, and storing their meaning in memory.
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Focus attention Minimize distractions Process messages accurately Think critically
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Checking for accuracy Giving (and getting) feedback such as applause,  head nodding, bored, or distracted look. Feedback:   Verbal and nonverbal audience response to  speech; usually taken seriously by a speaker  an incorporated into the speech when  possible. Evaluating messages
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Listener Distractions Listener’s mind may wander Listener: Concentrate on the speech; take notes. Speaker: Keep focused; tie each point to main idea Limited Attention Span Not hearing speech that are long or complex Listener: Practice gradually to hear longer speeches. Speaker: Divide speech into small, compact segments
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Jumping to Conclusion Missing the speaker’s point; judging by listener viewpoint  only. Listener: Try to set prejudices aside. Speaker: Careful audience analysis; extra effort on  clarity. Situational Distractions Following the distraction rather than the speech. Listener: Concentrate on the speech and on self- discipline. Speaker: Stay flexible; adapt to situation.
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Mapping Diagram the relationship between the thesis of a speech  and its main idea. Note Taking Record as much significant information as possible and  to do so as efficiently as possible. 
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Diagramming the relationship between the thesis of  a speech and its main ideas.
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