HypothesesandVariables_020210_020410

HypothesesandVariables_020210_020410 - Hypotheses and...

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Hypotheses and Variables Formulating the Research Problem  Once you have identified your research topic, you have to narrow it to your more specific problem that  you wish to study. 1. It should express a relationship. 2. It should be phrased in the form of a question. 3. It should imply possibilities of empirical testing. 4. It should be specific enough. What is the relationship between 2 or more variables? How does variable 1 impact variable 2? - Example : how does substance abuse affect obsessive compulsive disorder? - Example : how does depression affect people who have ADHD? Formulating the Hypotheses  The hypotheses follow from the research question. What do you think will happen? How will variable 1 impact variable 2? Needs to be based on previous research Must be capable of being confirmed or refuted Should always have 2 or more hypotheses If you have more than 2 variables, you will have more than 2 hypotheses Primary Two Hypotheses  Null Hypothesis o States that there is not a relationship between the variables Alternative Hypothesis (or Hypotheses) o States that there is a significant relationship between the variables (or that the group that  received “treatment” is significantly different than the control group) o Specifies the type of relationship that is expected based on previous research or theory Using Hypothesis Testing, we technically always test the Null Hypothesis and if it is not supported, then  we assume that the Alternative is correct. Two primary types of variables  Independent variable The proposed “cause” Is manipulated by the experimenter
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Has at least 2 levels (treatment and control groups) Dependent variable The proposed “effect” Is measured by the experimenter after the independent variable has been implemented You only need one dependent variable  Types of variables (both IV and DV)  Discrete – variable fits neatly into little groups; divide people in room based on hair colour (group of 
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HypothesesandVariables_020210_020410 - Hypotheses and...

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