Lecture2 - Lecture 2 4/1/10 Background reading: MBOC 5th...

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Lecture 2 4/1/10 Background reading: MBOC 5 th edition: Chapter 25: Pages 1544-1545; 1551-1552; 1557-1561 Chapter 10: Pages 617-621 MBOC 4 th edition: Chapter 24: Pages 1368-1369; 1375–1376; 1381-1384 Chapter 10: Pages 583-589 Lecture Outline: Immunochemical approaches Background of Adaptive Immunity Clonal selection Immunoglobulin G (IgG) Membrane Function Determination of membrane structure
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Tools (continued) Immunochemical approaches Tools (continued) Immunochemical approaches Immunochemical Approaches All organisms contain defense systems that enable them to survive in the presence of various pathogens to which they may be exposed. In addition to containing a somewhat primitive innate system possessed by most organisms, vertebrates have a specialized Adaptive immune system that enables them to defend themselves against a large variety of foreign organisms and toxic molecules. Lymphocytes are the cells involved in adaptive immunity. The human body contains about 2 x 10 12 lymphocytes that are are found in the blood and the lymph system. There are two main types of these cells: B cells and T cells . B cells produce circulating antibodies that are involved in the humoral immune response, whereas the T cells are involved in cellular immunity which will be discussed later in this course. Background of Adaptive Immunity
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Antibodies are collectively called Immunoglobulins (Ig ) and are among the most abundant protein components in the blood. Their role is to recognize foreign molecules and initiate events leading to their destruction. The ability of antibodies to bind to specific molecules makes
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This note was uploaded on 05/30/2010 for the course BIS BIS 104 taught by Professor Privalsky during the Spring '09 term at UC Davis.

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Lecture2 - Lecture 2 4/1/10 Background reading: MBOC 5th...

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