Exam1 - There will be NO QUESTIONS on the exam that are not mentioned in this study guide Most of the questions will be short essay format except

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There will be NO QUESTIONS on the exam that are not mentioned in this study guide. Most of the questions will be short essay format, except: You are expected to be able to answer in detail, with a substantial essay which  demonstrates knowledge, understanding, and application of * The four points of stasis in forensic argument, as discussed in Hollihan and Baaske  AND in lecture Four different levels for considering claims: “advocate for a federal program to provide immunization for poor children might stress  the severity of the debilitating effects of childhood illnesses, including the number of lives  lost to diseases that could have been prevented. Parents lack the financial means to  provide adequate medical care” 1. Conjecturing about a fact a. Does it exist? Is it true? Where did it come from? How did it begin? What is  its cause? Can it be changed? b. “significant numbers of poor children are not vaccinated and suffer diseases  because their parents cannot pay for required medical care” 2. Definition a. ( murder, self defense, manslaughter) b. It is not described or defined precisely as it should be c. Advocate might admit that significant numbers of poor children are not  vaccinated, but argue that this is not because there are no programs  available to provide the vaccinations. Instead, the advocate might assert that  children fail to receive vaccinations because their parents do not take  advantage of the existing programs. 3. Quality
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a. Beneficial to the society? b. Material facts and evidence are correct, other aspects influencing the material  quality of the claims might lead to different interpretations c. Admit that poor children are not vaccinated, and there are inadequate  programs to provide for vaccinations, but contend that the failure to vaccinate  is not a significant factor in the children’s health. Other reasons: such as  poverty 4. Objection a. Many of these children may have actually dies from other diseases for which  no immunizations were available. * the stock issues of deliberative argument, as presented by both textbooks Cost-benefit model 1. Ill a. Inadequacies or problems in the existing systems b. A flaw in the current health-care policy c. Qualitative significance: those affected are harmed in a serious way d. Quantitative significance: large numbers of children are affected e. What are the signs of a problem f. How widespread is the harm 2. Blame a. Assign responsibility for the existence of an ill b. What causes the problem
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c. Is the present system at fault? d.
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This note was uploaded on 05/31/2010 for the course COMM 306 taught by Professor Taplin during the Spring '07 term at USC.

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Exam1 - There will be NO QUESTIONS on the exam that are not mentioned in this study guide Most of the questions will be short essay format except

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