Chapter 3 � Amino Acids - Chapter 3 Amino Acids...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 3 – Amino Acids Cells can produce proteins with strikingly different properties and  activities by joining the same 20 amino acids in many different combinations and  sequences. Enzymes are the most varied and specialized protein products. Virtually all cellular  reactions are catalyzed by enzymes. Proteins are polymers of amino acids, with each amino acid residue joined to its neighbor  by a specific type of covalent bond. All 20 of the common amino acids are  α -amino acids. They have a carboxyl group and an amino group bonded to the same carbon atom  (the  α  carbon). They differ from each other in their side chains, or R groups, which vary in structure,  size, and electric charge, and which influence the solubility of the amino acids in  water. General structure of an amino acid.  This structure is common to all but  one of the  α -amino acids. (Proline, a cyclic amino acid, is the exception.)  The R group, or side chain (red), attached to the  α  carbon (blue) is  different in each amino acid. For all the common amino acids except glycine, the  α  carbon is bonded to four different  groups: a carboxyl group, an amino group, an R group, and a hydrogen atom. (In glycine  the R group is another hydrogen atom. 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Chapter 3 – Amino Acids o Stereoisomeri sm in  α -amino acids.  (a) The two stereoisomers of alanine, L- and  D-alanine, are nonsuperposable mirror images of each other  (enantiomers). (b, c) Two different conventions for showing the  configurations in space of stereoisomers. In perspective formulas  (b) the solid wedge-shaped bonds project out of the plane of the  paper, the dashed bonds behind it. In projection formulas (c) the  horizontal bonds are assumed to project out of the plane of the  paper, the vertical bonds behind. Humans are L form. All molecules  with a chiral center are optically active – they rotate plane  polarized light. Amino acids are divided into five groups:     2
Background image of page 2
Chapter 3 – Amino Acids 3
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Chapter 3 – Amino Acids 4
Background image of page 4
Chapter 3 – Amino Acids The 20 common amino acids of proteins.  The structural formulas show the state of  ionization that would predominate at pH 7.0. The unshaded portions are those common  to all the amino acids; the portions shaded in pink are the R groups. Although the R  group of histidine is shown uncharged, its pKa (see Table 3-1) is such that a small but  significant fraction of these groups are positively charged at pH 7.0. The protonated form  of histidine is shown above the graph in Figure 3-12b. Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an  autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by a deficiency in the hepatic enzyme 
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 05/31/2010 for the course BIOLOGICAL BIOL-103 taught by Professor Pokorski during the Spring '09 term at University of Michigan-Dearborn.

Page1 / 29

Chapter 3 � Amino Acids - Chapter 3 Amino Acids...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online