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L4[1] - Example Show that x P x Q x and are logically...

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Example Show that and are logically equivalent. ( ( ) ( )) x P x Q x   ( ( ) ( )) ( ( ) ( )) (De Morgan) x P x Q x x P x Q x       ( ( ) ( )) (convert) x P x Q x      ( ( ) ( )) x P x Q x ( ( ( )) ( ( ))) (De Morgan) x P x Q x       ( ( ) ( )) (double negation) x P x Q x  
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Rules of Inference: Terms An argument is a sequence of statements that end with a conclusion. An argument is valid if the conclusion follows from the truth of the preceding statements. That is, an argument is valid if and only if it is impossible for the preceding statements (premises) to be true while the conclusion is false. A fallacy is a common form of incorrect reasoning, which lead to invalid arguments.
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Rules of Inference I
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Rules of Inference II
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