2009+1F91+-+Ch+7+-+The+Weather+Systems+-+DONE[1]

2009+1F91+-+Ch+7+-+The+Weather+Systems+-+DONE[1] - Chapter...

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GEOG 1F91 – Physical Geography – Weather Systems [email protected] Chapter 7 Weather Systems
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Week of Topic Readings Laboratory September 14 Course Introduction Chapter 1 No Labs this week September 21 Introducing Physical Geography Chapter 1 / 2 Lab 1 (odd) September 28 Earth as Rotating Planet Chapter 2 / 3 Lab 1 (even) October 5 Global Energy System Chapter 3 / 4 Lab 2 (odd) October 12 Temperature Cycles Chapter 4 No Labs this week October 19 Winds and Circulation Chapter 5 Lab 2 (even) October 26 Moisture and Precipitation/ Quiz Chapter 6 Lab 3 (odd) November 2 Weather Systems Chapter 7 Lab 3 (even) November 9 Scope of Climate Chapter 8 Lab 4 (odd) November 16 Low­Latitude Climate Chapter 9 Lab 4 (even) November 23 Chapter 10 Lab 5 ( ALL ) November 30 Review Review GEOG 1F91 – Physical Geography – Weather Systems [email protected]
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GEOG 1F91 – Physical Geography – Weather Systems [email protected] The final examination schedule has been posted. Geography 1F91 is on Mon. Dec. 21 from 19:00 ­ 22:00 in WCDVIS Announcements
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GEOG 1F91 – Physical Geography – Weather Systems [email protected] Introduction Earth’s atmosphere in constant motion Driven by pressure gradients and steered by Coriolis effect Pressure systems move air horizontally Temperature moves air vertically Coupled with warming and cooling is moisture and precipitation Reoccurring circulation patterns and conditions associated with them are called Weather Systems These systems vary in size, duration, and intensity
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GEOG 1F91 – Physical Geography – Weather Systems [email protected] Air Masses An air mass is a large body of air with fairly uniform temperature and moisture characteristics. Can be thousands of kilometers across and extend well up into the troposphere Temperature is indicated using the upper case (for example, T for Tropical or P for Polar). Moisture is indicated using the lower case (for example, c for continental (dry) or m for maritime (wet)). Air masses acquire their characteristics from their source regions , where the air moves slowly or stagnates
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GEOG 1F91 – Physical Geography – Weather Systems [email protected] Air Masses An idealized continent producing continental ( c ) air masses is shown at the centre. It is surrounded by oceans, producing maritime air masses ( m ). Tropical ( T ) and equatorial ( E ) source regions provide warm or hot air masses, while polar ( P ), arctic ( A ), and Antarctic ( AA ) source regions provide colder air masses of low specific humidity. Global air masses and source regions.
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[email protected] Some air masses may move large distances and may on occasion influence weather over a large proportion of the continent (for example, the cold continental air masses from the north). North American Air Masses
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This note was uploaded on 06/01/2010 for the course GEOG 1F91 taught by Professor Nealpilger during the Fall '10 term at Brock University.

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2009+1F91+-+Ch+7+-+The+Weather+Systems+-+DONE[1] - Chapter...

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