12 - Monday, October 12th, 2009 Biochemistry 405 Lecture #6...

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1 Monday, October 12 th, 2009 Biochemistry 405 ± Lecture #6 Kane Hall 130 10:30- 11:20 am Lecturer: Wim Hol Slide Set #1
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2 Outline 1. Quarternary structure and Symmetry. - Point Group Symmetry -He l ica l Symmetry -Part ia l Symmetry -Non-symmetr ica l 2. Forces stabilizing protein structures. 3. Protein folding
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3 The arrangement of multiple protein chains into a larger assembly is called the ±quaternary structure² of that assembly. In living cells, many multi-protein assemblies occur. The advantages if bringing multiple proteins together are several, including: - multiple functions can be brought in close proximity , as in multi-enzyme complexes and in bacterial toxins; - ±cages² of sufficient size can be created, as in chaperones; - long fibers can be obtained, as in ±microfilaments². Multi-protein assemblies can: -have symmetry, or partial symmetry, or no symmetry at all; -consist of multiple copies of a single, of a few, or of numerous different proteins. Quaternary Structure
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4 Cyclic Point groups Dihedral Point Group Symmetry Cubic Point group Symmetry 7 7 The Three Types of Point Group Symmetry Arnthor Aevarsson Point group symmetry: all symmetry axes intersect in one point, the center of the particle
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5 Haemagglutinin From the surface of the influenza virus A Trimer with Cyclic C3 Point Group Symmetry Schematic
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6 A Heptamer with Cyclic C 7 Point Group Symmetry Shekhar Mande GroES The ±cap² of a protein folding machine Side view Top view
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7 Cyclic Point groups Dihedral Point Group Symmetry Cubic Point group Symmetry 7 7 The Three Types of Point Group Symmetry Point group symmetry: all symmetry axes intersect in one point, the center of the particle
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8 Schematic GroEL Dihedral D7 Point Group Symmetry GroEL: The ±body² of a protein folding machine, a 14-mer
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9 Cyclic Point groups Dihedral Point Group Symmetry Cubic Point group Symmetry 7 7 The Three Types of Point Group Symmetry
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10 Quaternary Structure The Three Types of ±Cubic² symmetry A game of intersecting 2-folds, 3-folds, 4-folds and 5-folds Only 2-folds and 3-folds 2-folds, 3-folds and 4-folds 2-folds, 3-folds and 5-folds Tetrahedral Symmetry Octahedral Symmetry Icosahedral Symmetry
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11 24-mer with octahedral symmetry of eight E2 Catalytic Domains trimers View along 4-fold axis Only the 4 trimers in the front are visible. Example of ±Octahedral² Symmetry: a hollow truncated cube Andrea Mattevi The Core of the Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Multi-Enzyme Complex 3-mer viewed along the 3-fold Three E2 Catalytic Domains (Each color is one domain) (Each sphere is one amino acid residue) X 8 =
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Several viruses have icosahedral symmetry RHINO VIRUS (human common cold virus) VP1, VP2 and VP3 subunits are quite similar in fold. Each subunit is present 60 times,
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This note was uploaded on 06/03/2010 for the course BIOL BIO 101 taught by Professor Drumheller during the Spring '10 term at University of Washington.

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12 - Monday, October 12th, 2009 Biochemistry 405 Lecture #6...

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