Powerpoint notes (unit 1-4)

Powerpoint notes - Powerpoint Notes Unit 1-4 Lecture 1 Introduction-Testamentum last will and testament-Old Testament Jewish scripture-Jewish

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Powerpoint Notes Unit 1-4 Lecture 1: Introduction -“Testamentum”- last will and testament -Old Testament- Jewish scripture -Jewish expression “new diatheke” then used in early Jesus movement to refer to a new religious arrangement, contrasted with earlier “covenant” from time of Moses -Christians eventually referred to a certain portion of scriptures as writings belonging to new diatheke -The NT is a collection, not a single writing -Modern New Testament (27 writings) -NT writings composed by 16-19 different authors, over almost 100 years -Connections in NT -Paul wrote several of them -Writer of one work sometimes is using/adapting another -VARIETY Lecture 2: NT as a Text -Materials: broken pottery, wax tablets, wood, papyrus, parchment (animal skin, 4 th century +), metals -Formats: single sheet letter with seal, roll (scroll) made of sheets joined together, book (codex) made of one or more gathering of sheets -Oldest surviving copies: Egypt, papyrus, codex, 2nd-3 rd century -Greek, Capital letters, no chapter, sentence, paragraph, word divisions -Codex Sinaiticus (4 th century) -well known to western scholars in 1840s -parchment
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-contains greek OT (Septuagint) and NT w/ Letter of Barnabas and Shepherd of Hermas -Codex Vaticanus (4 th Century) -known to western scholars in late 1800s -parchment -Greek OT (Septuagint) and NT -Codex Alexandrinus (5 th century) -Codex Bezae (5 th -6 th century) in Greek and Latin -Palimpsest- rewritten manuscripts -miniscules- cursive -Auxanousin- an inadvertent change from the older reading -Ouxenousin- in the text of essentially the same saying as found in one of the Greek fragments of the Gospel of Thomas Lecture 3: NT as Canon -Canon- standardized authoritative collection of writings -Modern NT Canon: 4 gospels, 13 pauline letters, Acts of Apostles, 8 other letters, 1 apocalypse -Increased evidence of standardization in 4 th century+ after Christianity official religion of Roman Empire -first surviving manuscripts with whole almost whole canon are from 4 th century -in Athanasius of Alexandria in 367 CE (first one w/ 27 writings) -not completely standardized in 4 th cent. As found other codices with variations -codex Sinaiticus (includes letter of Barnabas and shepherd of Hermas) -codex Alexandrinus (includes 1 Clement and 2 Clement) -Eusebius of Caesarea (325 CE) threefold grouping that listed “recognized”, “disputed” and “not genuine” writings -no surviving canon list comparable to Eusebius before 4 th cent (maybe Muratorian)
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-1 st evidence of 4 gospel model: Irenaeus of Lyons (180 CE) -not readily accepted yet -others used more than the four -Pauline Letters -began during his lifetime -Marcion of SInope (mid-2 nd cent CE) advocated a collection of scriptures with only 1 Gospel and 10 Pauline Letters -OT (in Jesus’ time) -no fixed Jewish Bible, there was… -Torah: the law -Nebi’im: prophets -Kethubim: other writings more loosely defined with diversity in acceptance -TaNaK -not standardized until well after Christianity separated from Judaism
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This note was uploaded on 06/03/2010 for the course RELIG 220 taught by Professor Michaelwilliams during the Spring '08 term at University of Washington.

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Powerpoint notes - Powerpoint Notes Unit 1-4 Lecture 1 Introduction-Testamentum last will and testament-Old Testament Jewish scripture-Jewish

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