Iroquois transportation Notes

Iroquois transportation Notes - I roquois transportation...

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Unformatted text preview: I roquois transportation Notes The favorite method of travel for the Huron and I roquois people that lived around the Great Lakes seemed to be the canoe since waterways were everywhere. Early European people that came to Canada left written records of how impressed they were with the Huron and I roquois birch bark canoe which were built in many different sizes. The canoes ranged in size from three to eight meters in length. The smaller canoes could be paddled by one person while the larger canoes would hold several people. Birch bark was the favorite building material for canoes since birch trees were plentiful and the bark was light weight which made a fast moving water craft. Also, birch bark was an easier bark to work with and the canoe could be built more precisely. Even though the birch bark canoe was so light weight, it could still carry heavy loads. The Huron and Iroquois people began building a canoe by stripping the bark from the tree in long sheets. The best time for harvesting the bark from the tree was in the tree in long sheets....
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This note was uploaded on 06/03/2010 for the course LAW 152210 taught by Professor Mr.simon during the Fall '10 term at Princeton.

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Iroquois transportation Notes - I roquois transportation...

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