4.1.ImageformationbyMirrorsandLenses

4.1.ImageformationbyMirrorsandLenses - Object-Image A...

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1 4.1 Images formed by Mirrors and Lenses • Images • Image formation by mirrors • Images formed by lenses Object-Image • A physical object is usually observed by reflected light that diverges from the object. • An optical system (mirrors or lenses) can produce an image of the object by redirecting the light. – Real Image – Virtual Image Real Image Object real Image Optical System diverging converging diverging Light passes through the real image Film at the position of the real image is exposed. Virtual Image Object virtual Image Optical System diverging d iv e rg in g Light appears to come from the virtual image but does not pass through the virtual image Film at the position of the virtual image is not exposed. Image formed by a plane mirror. The virtual image is formed directly behind the mirror. Light does not pass through the image Object Image Each point on the image can be determined by tracing 2 rays from the object. mirror B B’ A A’ object image p q A virtual image is formed by a plane mirror at a distance q behind the mirror. q = -p
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2 Parabolic Mirrors Parallel rays reflected by a parabolic mirror are focused at a point, called the Focal Point located on the optic axis. Optic Axis Parabolic Reflector Parabolic mirrors can be used to focus incoming parallel rays to a small area or to direct rays diverging from a small area into parallel rays. Spherical mirrors •Spherical mirrors are much easier to fabricate than parabolic mirrors • A spherical mirror is an approximation of a parabolic mirror for small curvatures. (i.e. for paraxial rays –close to parallel to the optic axis. • Spherical mirrors can be convex or concave light light concave convex Parallel beams focus at the focal point of a Concave Mirror.
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This note was uploaded on 06/03/2010 for the course PHYS physics 1c taught by Professor Smith during the Spring '09 term at UCSD.

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4.1.ImageformationbyMirrorsandLenses - Object-Image A...

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