Lectures_10 - Fig 8-CO p.200 Air Masses and mid-latitude Storms Fig 8-1 p.202 Here a large extremely cold winter air mass is dominating the weather

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Unformatted text preview: Fig. 8-CO, p.200 Air Masses and mid-latitude Storms Fig. 8-1, p.202 Here, a large, extremely cold winter air mass is dominating the weather over much of the Southern Canada and the Central United States. At almost all cities, the air is cold and dry. Upper number is air temperature(°F); bottom number is dew point (°F). Notion of Air Mass Air Masses • The idea behind the concept of an air mass is that a large body of air has similar properties • This can occur when air travels over land or sea and the surface air picks up the properties of the surface • E.g. over the ocean the temperature is relatively uniform and of course the humidity is high • Over the land it might be very cold (snowy) and so the surface air would cool Table 8-1, p.203 Fig. 8-2, p.203 Air mass source regions and their paths . Fig. 8-4, p.206 Visible satellite image showing the modification of cP air as it moves over the warmer Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean. Air mass generation Fig. 8-10, p.211 During June 29 and 30, 1990,continental tropical air covered a large area of the central and western United States. Numbers on the map represent maximum temperatures (°F) during this period. The large H with the isobar shows the upper-level position of the subtropical high. Sinking air associated with the high contributed to the hot weather. Winds aloft were weak, with the main flow shown by the heavy arrow. Summer Air mass Fig. 8-9, p.210 Weather conditions during an unseasonably hot spell in the eastern portion of the United States that occurred between the 15th and 20th of April, 1976. The surface low-pressure area and fronts are shown for April 17. Numbers to the east of the surface low (in red) are maximum temperatures recorded during the hot spell, while those to the west of the low (in blue) are...
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This note was uploaded on 06/05/2010 for the course EATS 1011 taught by Professor Johnm during the Winter '10 term at York University.

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Lectures_10 - Fig 8-CO p.200 Air Masses and mid-latitude Storms Fig 8-1 p.202 Here a large extremely cold winter air mass is dominating the weather

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