LectureHandoutsCET101 - CET 101 Plane Surveying Notes...

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CET 101 - Plane Surveying Notes Compiled by Knud E. Hermansen Professor P.L.S., P.E., Ph.D., Esq. University of Maine Construction Management Technology Surveying Engineering Technology Civil & Environmental Engineering Fall/Spring Semester
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1 Preparing Homework 1. Use green or white engineering paper or computer generated print on white paper. If you are using engineering paper the side with the dark grid lines is the BACK. 2. Always begin by restating the question. You may state the question in simpler terms. 3. When answering the question write the relevant equations or citation where the equations or information can be found. 4. List any constants, assumptions, or symbols. 5. Show an example calculation if numerous calculations are required and being done on a spreadsheet or calculator. 6. Show the answer in a clearly discernable manner (highlight, underline, boldface, etc.) 7. Show any relevant checks. Notes: 1. Always do a unit cross-check and show the appropriate units for the answer. 2. Always show the appropriate significant figures in the answer. Example 1. Question: For a length of 231.22 feet, what is the equivalent length in meters? ____________________ Your Response ____________________ Question 1 Problem Restatement : Convert 231.22 feet (L) to meters. Constants : 25.4 mm / in 12 in / ft 3.28084 ft. / m. Equations : L ft. * 12 in / ft * 25.4 mm / in / 1000 m. / mm = Distance (m.) Answer m. * 3.28084 ft. / m. = Distance (ft.) Application : 231.22 ft. * 12 in / ft * 25.4 mm / in / 1000 m. / mm = 70.476 m. Check : 70.476 m. * 3.28084 ft. / m. = 231.22 ft.
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2 Lecture Topics Topics 9th Edition 10th Edition Errors and Fieldbooks Chapter 2, Chapter 3, Appendix D Chapter 2 Part I, Chapter 3, Chapter 2, Part II, Appendix B Directions Chapter 8, Chapter 9 Chapter 7 Traverse Computations Chapter 12, Chapter 13, Appendix F Chapter 9, Chapter 10 Area Chapter 14 Chapter 12 Angles Chapter 10, Chapter 11 Chapter 8, Appendix A-3, A-4, A-5 Distance Measuring Chapter 4, Chapter 5, Appendix A Chapter 6, Chapter 8-19 Elevations & Leveling Chapter 6, Chapter 7 Chapter 4, Chapter 5 Intersection Appendix B, Appendix E Chapter 11 Contours & Mapping Chapter 17 Chapter 17
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3 Measurements and Error General Statements : A. For any measurement there will be some error B. Some errors will exceed the correct value, some will be less than the correct value C. Without introducing bias, measurements will clump about the correct value D. Most times the correct value is not known, so the mean is used Terms : A. Mean (x ave ): The average. The value that is statistically centered. B. Standard Deviation(s): The value, when placed on both sides of the mean, encompasses 68.27% of the probability. The standard deviation is located at the point of inflection of the Gaussian distribution curve. C. Mode: The most repeated value. For a gaussian distribution, the median approximates the mode. D. Median: The middle value if all measurements are ranked highest to lowest. Use : A. Mean: The mean is used to represent the correct value. Since the correct value is not known, the mean is the best choice or closest approximation.
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