lecture3-20-07 - 151 lecture Worker and Job Mobility A...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
151 lecture Worker and Job Mobility A. Introduction We have been emphasizing °frictions± in the labor market that impede costless mobility as well as institutions in secondary labor markets that may generate too much mobility (°excess churning±). Our focus this week is on mobility²the costs and benefits. We look first at geographic mobility of workers²most of which are not transfers of a job location, but involve changing employers. We will look both at internal migration within the U.S. and international migration to the U.S. [In the following lecture we will look at mobility of workers among jobs and employers, without a necessary geographic change, as well as longevity and returns to worker- employer matches.] B. Migration modeled 1. Quantities: Stock (not flow) of immigrant workers is about 12 percent of stock of U.S. labor force, and perhaps one-third to one-half of the net flow. 2. Human capital model : geographic migration as an economic investment. Usual net present value formula. Assumes migration is: a. voluntary, so excludes political refugees and forced migration (slavery). b. rational with mainly economic motivation and individually-based, as opposed to keeping family together (tied movers) or family re-unification. Note that return migration is large in most historical periods²one-fourth to one-third, although much smaller recently from Mexico, as we shall see later. 3. Two aspects: pull and push . Most migrants do cite economic motives. a. Pull consists of wage differentials as well as employment probability differentials.
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern