68947-Ch11_IM

68947-Ch11_IM - Chapter 11 Terrestrial Flora and Fauna This chapter examines such questions as What is the range of certain species or group of

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 11: Terrestrial Flora and Fauna This chapter examines such questions as “What is the range of certain species or group of plants/animals?”, “What are the reasons behind this distribution pattern?”, and “What is the significance of the distribution?” TOPICS Ecosystems and Biomes Ecosystem: A Concept for All Scales Biome: A Scale for Biogeographers Terrestrial Flora Characteristics of Plants Floristic Terminology Environmental Adaptations The Critical Role of Competition Spatial Groupings of Plants Terrestrial Fauna Characteristics of Animals Kinds of Animals Environmental Adaptations Competition among Animals Cooperation among Animals Zoogeographic Regions The Major Biomes Tropical Rainforest Tropical Deciduous Forest Tropical Scrub Tropical Savanna Desert Mediterranean Woodland and Shrub Midlatitude Grassland Midlatitude Deciduous Forest Boreal Forest Tundra Human Modification of Natural Distribution Patterns Physical Removal of Organisms Habitat Modification Artificial Translocation of Organisms Focus: Desert Adaptations of the Amazing Camel People and the Environment: Rainforest Loss in Brazil KEY TERMS adret slope (p. 321) angiosperm (p. 315) annual (plant) (p. 314) biome (p. 313) broadleaf tree (p. 315) climax vegetation (p. 317) conifer (p. 315) deciduous tree (p. 315) 146
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
desert (p. 319) ecosystem (p. 313) ecotone (p. 314) endothermic (p. 323) evergreen tree (p. 315) exotic species (p. 347) forest (p. 318) grassland (p. 319) gymnosperm (p. 315) herbaceous plant (p. 315) hydrophyte (p. 316) hygrophyte (p. 316) invertebrate (p. 323) needleleaf tree (p. 315) perennial (plant) (p. 314) riparian vegetation (p. 321) shrubland (p. 318) symbiosis (p. 327) treeline (p. 321) tundra (p. 319) ubac slope (p. 321) vertebrate (p. 323) vertical zonation (p. 320) wetland (p. 320) woodland (p. 318) woody plant (p. 315) xerophytic adaptation (p. 316) zoogeographic regions (p. 328) CHAPTER OUTLINE I. Ecosystems and Biomes A. Two organizing principles are ecosystem and biome. B. Ecosystem: A Concept for All Scales 1. Ecosystem —the totality of interactions among organisms and the environment in the area of consideration. a) Encompasses both the living and nonliving portion and how energy flows among them. b) Weakness—there is an almost infinite variety in the magnitude of ecosystems that can be studied: (1) Range includes whole Earth itself to drop of water. C. Biome: A Scale for All Biogeographers 1. Biome —a large, recognizable assemblage of plants and animals in functional interaction with its environment. a) Most appropriate scale for understanding world distribution patterns. b) Eleven major types (listed on page 289). c) Often significant and even predictable relationships exist between the biota (particularly the flora) of a biome and the associated climate and soil types. d)
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 06/06/2010 for the course EC 11 taught by Professor All during the Spring '10 term at UCLA.

Page1 / 23

68947-Ch11_IM - Chapter 11 Terrestrial Flora and Fauna This chapter examines such questions as What is the range of certain species or group of

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online