REL_Supplemental_Material_revised_32019.pdf - Supplemental course map comparing the current Religious Studies major and the revised Religious Studies

REL_Supplemental_Material_revised_32019.pdf - Supplemental...

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Unformatted text preview: Supplemental course map comparing the current Religious Studies major and the revised Religious Studies major: Current major Revised major Required methods course (taught 1x/year): • REL 292: Approaches to the Study of Religion Required methods course (taught 1x/year): • REL 292: Approaches to the Study of Religion (taught 1x/year) Required senior seminar (taught 1x/year): • REL 492: Senior Seminar Required senior seminar (taught 1x/year): • REL 492: Senior Seminar Gateway Course (18-19 sections/year) Required 100-level course: • REL 110: Religion in a Global Context Gateway Courses (20-21 sections/year) Choose one of the following 100-level courses: • REL 110: Religion in a Global Context (16-17 sections/year) • REL 112: Religion and Power (2/year) • REL 120: Magic (taught every other year) • REL 121: Religion and Rock & Roll (taught every other year) • REL 131 Jewish Biblical Literature in Context (taught 1x/year) • REL 132 Early Christian Literature in Context (taught 1x/year) • REL 141 African Gods (every other year) • (Other experimental courses in this category may also be taught 1x/year) Texts and Traditions courses (7 taught per year) Traditions courses (5-6 taught per year) Select one course from the following: • REL 201 Buddhist Traditions (taught 1x/year) • REL 202 Hindu Traditions (taught 1x/year) • REL 203 Islamic Traditions (taught 1x/year) Select two courses from the following: • REL 181 Buddhist Traditions (taught 1x/year) • REL 182 Hindu Traditions (taught 1x/year) • REL 183 Islamic Traditions (taught 1x/year) • REL 184 Christian Traditions (taught 1x/year) Select one course from the following: • REL 204 Christian Traditions (taught 1x/year) • REL 205 Jewish Traditions (taught 1x/year) • REL 211 The Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) (taught 1x/year) • REL 212 Introduction To The New Testament And Early Christian Literature (taught 1x/year) • • REL 185 Jewish Traditions (taught 1x/year) REL 186 Irreligious And Secular Traditions (taught every other year) Select an additional five REL courses. At least four must be at the 300 or 400 level. At least one must be a 400-level topic seminar. Select an additional five REL courses. At least four must be at the 300 or 400 level. At least one must be a 400-level topic seminar. We offer 4 other 200-level courses each year, in a rotation that includes the following catalogued courses (as well as a number of experimental courses that have not yet been catalogued): We will offer 3-4 other 200-level courses each year, in a rotation that includes the following catalogued courses (as well as a number of experimental courses that have not yet been catalogued): • • • • • REL 236 Religion And Racing REL 237 Religion And Rock'n'roll REL 238 Religion And Film REL 239 Judaism And The Environment REL 286 India's Identities: Religion, Caste And Gender In Contemporary South India We offer 6 300-level courses each year, in a rotation that has included the following catalogued courses (as well as a number of experimental courses, many of which are now being catalogued), with each course taught every 2-3 years: • • REL 311 Beyond Conflict And Tolerance: Interreligious Encounter And Social Change REL 312 Religion Goes Global: Fanatics, Frauds, And Peacemakers • • • REL 238 Religion And Film REL 239 Judaism And The Environment REL 286 India's Identities: Religion, Caste And Gender In Contemporary South India We will offer 6 300-level courses each year, in a rotation that will include the following courses, with each course taught every 2-3 years: • • • • REL 311 Beyond Conflict And Tolerance: Interreligious Encounter And Social Change REL 312 Religion Goes Global: Fanatics, Frauds, And Peacemakers REL 323: Satan and the Supernatural REL 325 The Apocalyptic Imagination, Ancient And Modern • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • REL 324 Theodicy: The Problem Of Evil In Ancient Jewish And Christian Literature REL 325 The Apocalyptic Imagination, Ancient And Modern REL 326 Sex Lives Of Saints: Sex, Gender And Family In Early Christianity REL 327 Messiahs, Martyrs And Memory REL 332 Religion And Science REL 337 Interrogating God: Humanity's Search For Meaning REL 338 Jewish-christian Encounters REL 339 God And Politics REL 343 Women, Violence And Resistance REL 344 Christianity And Social Justice REL 348 Environmental Ethics REL 350 Silk Road: Then And Now REL 356 Chinese "Religions" From Confucius To Mao REL 357 Sages And Samurai: Religion In The Japanese Experience REL 358 Sites And Rites: Sacred Space And Ritual In World Religions REL 360 Hindu Goddesses: From Myths To Movies REL 361 Women, Religion And Ethnography REL 362 Heroes, Saints And Demons: Hindu Textual Traditions REL 363 Women In Islam: Veneration, Veils And Voices REL 382 Jewish Ethics REL 383 Jewish Philosophy And Mysticism: Guiding The Perplexed REL 384 Modern Jewish Thought REL 395 Religion In Modern African Fiction • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • REL 326: Sex Lives of Saints: Sex, Gender and Ancient Mediterranean Religions: REL 327 Messiahs, Martyrs And Memory REL 330: Religion and American Popular Culture REL 336: Religion and War in America REL 344 Christianity And Social Justice REL 348 Environmental Ethics REL 350 Silk Road: Then And Now REL 356 Chinese "Religions" From Confucius To Mao REL 357 Sages And Samurai: Religion In The Japanese Experience REL 358 Sites And Rites: Sacred Space And Ritual In World Religions REL 359: Religion and Healing REL 360 Hindu Goddesses: From Myths To Movies REL 361 Women, Religion And Ethnography REL 362: Religion And Storytelling In Hindu Worlds REL 363 Women In Islam: Veneration, Veils And Voices REL 382 Jewish Ethics REL 383 Jewish Philosophy And Mysticism: Guiding The Perplexed REL 384 Modern Jewish Thought REL 385 Jewish-Christian Encounters REL 390: Love and Ecstasy REL 391: Beyond Jihad: Encounters with Islam REL 392: Religion, Magic, and Science REL 395 Religion In Modern African Fiction We offer 2 400-level topic seminars each year, none of which have been catalogued • 460-469 Special Topics (none catalogued) Total number of sections offered per year: 39-40 We will offer 2 400-level topic seminars each year, most of which have been catalogued, but we are cataloging the ones that have been or are about to be taught 3 times: • REL 460-469 Special Topics (experimental courses) • REL 463: Comparative Mysticism • REL 464: War and Judaism, from the Bible to Zionism • REL 465: Ghosts, Demons & Ancestors in Asian Religions Total number of sections offered per year: 39-40 Schedule for new REL courses: REL 112: Religion and Power: taught every semester, beginning Fall 2019 REL 120: Magic: taught every other year, beginning in Spring 2020 REL 121: Religion and Rock & Roll: taught every year, beginning in Fall 2020 REL 131: Jewish Biblical Literature in Context: taught every spring REL 132: Early Christian Literature in Context: taught every fall REL 141: African Gods: taught every other year, beginning in Winter 2019 REL 181: Buddhist Traditions: taught every spring REL 182: Hindu Traditions: taught every fall REL 183: Islamic Traditions: taught every fall REL 184: Christian Traditions: taught every spring REL 185: Jewish Traditions: taught every fall REL 186: Irreligious and Secular Traditions: taught every other spring, beginning in Spring 2020 REL 323: Satan and the Supernatural: taught every three years, beginning in Spring 2019 REL 326: Sex Lives of Saints: Sex, Gender and Ancient Mediterranean Religions: REL 330: Religion and American Popular Culture: taught every other year, beginning in Fall 2019 REL 336: Religion and War in America: taught every other year, beginning in Fall 2020 REL 359: Religion and Healing: taught every other year, beginning in Spring 2021 REL 390: Love and Ecstasy: taught every three years, beginning in Spring 2020 REL 391: Beyond Jihad: Encounters with Islam: taught every three years, beginning in Fall 2022 REL 392: Religion, Magic, and Science: taught every three years, beginning in Spring 2021 REL 463: Comparative Mysticism: taught every three years, beginning in Spring 2021 REL 464: War and Judaism, from the Bible to Zionism: taught every three years, beginning in Spring 2020 REL 465: Ghosts, Demons & Ancestors in Asian Religions: taught every three years, beginning in Fall 2021 REL 112: Religion and Power Class time and location: MWF 8am-9:10am, Lindner 204 Dr. Andrew Monteith [email protected] / office: Spence Pavilion 210 / mailbox: Campus Box 2340 Office Hours: Monday 9:30-11; Thursdays 1-2; and by appointment “Religion” is sometimes understood to refer to a sphere of human activity that is mainly about private beliefs and community rituals. But is that really the extent of it? How might “religion” escape those private boundaries, altering, guiding, or shaping other spheres of social activity? And what about the inverse, how might social forces also shape religious identity, practice, and ideals? In this course, we will examine the ways that religion and colonialism have interacted, both historically and today. (By colonialism, we mean a range of power relationships—often international—that involve one group imposing some degree of rule upon another.) In this course, we will tackle questions about how certain styles of religion have fomented colonialism, how colonialism helped form new ways of being religious (such as Santeria or Vodou), but also how these interactions have helped produce certain understandings of “progress,” “civilization,” and “culture” that still circulate today. By the end of this course, students should be able to: 1) explain some reasons why “religion” is a complicated and sometimes ambiguous category 2) use historical precedents to better understand/interpret contemporary phenomena 3) recognize some of the ways that “religion” interacts with (and is occasionally inseparable from) other social forces 4) understand the role that “the other” can sometimes play in religious, political, and legal discourse Grades and Assignments: Reading Responses (15%): we will typically begin class with a short reading response concerning the assigned readings for that day, graded on a 0-3 points scale. These responses will ask you to respond to some question about the day’s material. They are not meant to be trick questions, but rather are intended to: 1) get you thinking about the day’s material, 2) show me that you did the reading, and 3) serve as a substitute for taking attendance. Writing down your name shows me you were here, and is worth 1 point. An answer that isn’t quite wrong (but also isn’t obviously right) is 2 points. A good answer that demonstrates familiarity with the reading for that day is 3 points. Midterm (25%, Mar 6): Although there is no final exam per se, there is a midterm on October 1. This midterm will cover the preceding material, and will be part multiple choice, part short answer, and part essay. We will discuss this more in-depth in mid-September. Short paper #1, 2-4 pages (10%, due April 13): You have been asked to write a short article for a magazine. They want you to explain “religion in the Caribbean” for them. Using knowledge drawn from our class discussions and readings, explain to your readers what “Caribbean religion” is. Be sure to 1) include specific examples, and 2) bring colonialism into your answer and explain its relevance. You do not need outside sources for this. Short paper #2, 2-4 pages (20%, due Apr 27): Christina Platt’s novel, The Truth About Awiti, blends a number of our course topics together. What, in your view, does she wish to say to her readers? Why does her story stretch across so many centuries? The religious elements in her story are fictional, but do you think she intends them to have power as metaphors? Does Platt think the world of Awiti’s early years is different from the world of Awiti’s older years? These questions are meant to be guides for your writing, but you are not restricted to them if you have other ideas about what you wish to examine. Good papers will identify how The Truth About Awiti relates with other course themes. Final Paper, 4-7 pages (30%): Your final paper will ask you to imagine that you are a policy consultant. The U.S. government and several NGOs are making plans to move into war-torn Syria, with the intended goal of bringing the violence to an end and restoring law, order, and human rights. Using your knowledge of the course materials, you will offer advice about the specific plans put forward by these groups. What insight do our readings and discussions offer? Should any of these groups consider taking a different approach, and if so, what would you suggest? You will receive their specific (and fictional) plans and mission statements later in the semester. This assignment should rely on course materials, not outside sources. Use it to demonstrate your understanding of course themes/topics and how they can be applied to real-world scenarios. Required Texts: Olmos and Paravisini-Gebert, Creole Religions of the Caribbean, 2nd ed. CP Patrick [Christine Platt], The Truth About Awiti All other readings are available on moodle unless otherwise indicated. Course Schedule Week 1 - Intro Week M Feb 4 – Welcome! W Feb 6 – Catherine Albanese, An Elephant in the Dark F Feb 8 - J.Z. Smith, “What a Difference a Difference Makes,” 251-276 Week 2 – Christianity M Feb 11 – Intro to Christianity (origins) Joseph Lynch, The Medieval Church, 1-34 W Feb 13 – Joseph Lynch, The Medieval Church, 35-52; Pierre Maraval, “The Earliest Phase of Christian Pilgrimage in the Near East,” 63-74; F Feb 15 – Huston Smith “Islam,” 146-169; Quran – Suras 1 + 55 Week 3 – Islam / Crusades M Feb 18 – Denney, An Introduction to Islam, 83-100, The Pact of Omar, 17-18 W Feb 20 – “Urban II’s Call for a Crusade,” 39-46; Jean Flori, “Ideology and Motivations in the First Crusade,” 15-30; “The Crusaders in Mayence, May 27, 1096” 128-133 F Feb 22 – Robert Williams, The American Indian in Western Legal Thought, 59-93 Week 4 – Crusades / Early Colonialism M Feb 25 – Robert Williams, The American Indian in Western Legal Thought, 151-173 W Feb 27 – John Winthrop, “A Model of Christian Charity” 1-9 F Mar 1 – Peter Silver Our Savage Neighbors, 3-37 Week 5 – Religion and the Colonization of the U.S. M Mar 4 – Sylvester Johnson, African American Religions, 1500-2000 1-53 (read 1-9 carefully; skim the rest for the main points and thematic arguments) W Mar 6 – Midterm F Mar 8 – TBA Week 6 – Midterm / Colonialism and Afro-Diaspora Religions in the Caribbean M Mar 11 – Caribbean Religions, 1-32 W Mar 13 – Caribbean Religions, 33-53 F Mar 15 – Caribbean Religions, 116-141 Week 7 – Caribbean Afro-Diaspora Religions / Intro to “Civilizing Mission” M Mar 18 – Sylvester Johnson, “Religion and American Empire in the Mississippi, 1790-1833,” 36-53; American Anthropologist (1888), “From Barbarism to Civilization,” 97-123 (SKIM the American Anthropologist article) W Mar 20 – David Grua, Surviving Wounded Knee: The Lakotas and the Politics of Memory, 1130 F Mar 22 – Jacqueline Fear-Segal and Susan D. Rose, Carlisle Indian Industrial School, 1-18; Capt. Richard H. Pratt, excerpts from ”Kill the Indian and Save the Man” Mar 25-29: Spring Break Week 8 – The Civilizing Mission and Euro-American Colonialism M Apr 1 – Tunde Adeleke – UnAfrican Americans, 70-91 W Apr 3 – US Colonialism; interview with William McKinley, letter from Bishop Charles Henry Brent; General James Rusling, “Interview with President McKinley,” (1 page), Letter from the Philippine Church Endowment Fund (1 page), Letter from Charles Henry Brent to Bishop Hall, May 3, 1904 (3 pages), U.S. State Dept, “The Philippine-American War, 1899-1902,” Theodore Roosevelt, “Free Silver, Trusts, and the Philippines” (points 5 and 6 ONLY) F Apr 5 – Tisa Wegner, “Making Empire in the Philippines: Filipinos, Moros, and the Ambivalence of Religious Freedom” 54-100 Week 9 – Rastafarianism / U.S. Colonialism in East Asia, Caribbean M Apr 8 – The Truth About Awiti – class discussion over first half (1-128) W Apr 10 – Caribbean Religions, 183-202 F Apr 12 – Wilbur Crafts, Intoxicating Drinks & Drugs in All Lands and Times, 2-28 S Apr 13 – First short paper due on Moodle by 10 AM Week 10 – The Truth About Awiti; The Civilizing Mission and Drugs M Apr 15 – The Truth About Awiti – class discussion over second half (131-295) W Apr 17 – Hugh Urban, “The Native American Church: Ancient Tradition in a Modern Legal Context,” 26-43; Henry Vruwink, “Peyote or Mescal” (1915 – document is damaged, but most of it is still readable. Do your best to read the damaged sections but don’t worry too much if you can’t make them out.) F Apr 19 – Laura Briggs, “Debating Reproduction: Birth Control, Eugenics, and Overpopulation in Puerto Rico, 1920-1940” 74-108 Week 11 – The Truth About Awiti; Colonialism, Secularism, and Health; Zionism M Apr 22 NO CLASS [Easter] W Apr 24 - Theodor Herzl, 215-226; Isaac Kook, 419-431; Ze’ev Jabotinsky, 41-43; Balfour Declaration F Apr 26 – Arnold Blumberg, “Birth of the State of Israel, 1947-1949,” 69-89 Avi Shlaim, “Did they leave or were they pushed?” 54-61 S Apr 27 - Truth About Awiti essay due on Moodle by 10 AM Week 12 – Zionism, Israel, and Palestine M May 1 – Muhammad Abdel Salam al-Farag, “The Forgotten Duty,” 417-424; Ismail R. alFaruqi, “Islam and Zionism,” 261-267; Third World Quarterly, “Interview with Yassir Arafat,” 399-410 W May 3 – Vox, “Israeli Settlements, Explained”: John Hagee, In Defense of Israel, 1-8, 58-59 F May 5 – Raymond Betts, “Decolonization” 1-2; Bikhu Parikh, Gandhi: A Very Short Introduction 35-48; Frantz Fanon, Wretched of the Earth 235-239 Week 13 –Somalia, Iraq, Afghanistan, and the War on Terror M May 6 – Newsweek, “Mission of Mercy; It’s Our Fight Now,” 26; Audrey Hepburn, “Unforgettable Silence”; Walter S. Clarke, Background Information for Operation: Restore Hope, 1-20 W May 8 – Mahmoud Mamdani, Good Muslim, Bad Muslim: America, The Cold War, and the War on Terror, 119-177 F May 10 – Lila Abu-Lughod, “Do Muslim Women (Still) Need Saving? Week 14 - Conclusion M May 13 – closing discussion (no new reading) Finals Week May 21 - 8:00-11am: You will bring a hard copy of your final paper to our class, where you will explain to the rest of us what conclusions you came to and how you reached them. Technical Matters and Policies Honor Code: Elon’s honor pledge calls for a commitment to Elon’s shared values of Honesty, Integrity, Responsibility, and Respect. To be clear about what constitutes violations of these values; students should be familiar with code of conduct policies described in the student handbook. Students with questions about the specific interpretation of these values and violations as they relate to this course should contact this instructor immediately. Violations in academic-related areas will be documented in an incident report which will be maintained in the Office of Student Conduct, and may result in a lowering of the course grade and/or failure of the course with an Honor Code F. Violations specifically covered by academic honor code policies include: plagiarism, cheating, lying, stealing, and the facilitation of another’s dishonesty. Multiple violations may result in a student’s suspension from the University. Disabilities Resources: If you are a student with a documented disability who will require accommodations in this course, please register with Disabilities Resources using the following link: . You may reach out to Disabilities Resources for assistance in developing a plan to address your academic needs. Disability Resources is located in the Koenigsberger Learning Center (Belk Library 226; 336278-6568). For more information about Disabilities Resources, please visit the website: . Writing Center : Elon’s Writing Center in the Center for Writing Excellence is staffed by trained peer-consultants who can help you with all of your writing projects (for any class or major and for any extracu...
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