Conflict and Negotiation1

Conflict and Negotiation1 - Conflict and Negotiation...

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Conflict and Negotiation
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Conflict : It’s n ot a matter of IF but rather, WHEN ! Conflict Defined Perceived interference or opposition to one’s goals .” Or -- “ Whenever interests collide, conflict  arises .”  (Gareth Morgan, Organizational Theorist) More broadly, conflict is a process that begins when  one party perceives that another party has negatively  affected, or is about to negatively affect, something  that the first party cares about.
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MORE ON: Defining Conflict This is a flexible definition, encompassing  the full range of conflict levels  from subtle  differences to overt, violent acts. This is a broad definition, encompassing a  wide range of conflict types  that people  experience in organizations (as noted in  Stage I of the “Conflict Process”).
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Transitions in Conflict Thought THERE ARE THREE VIEWS: 1). Traditional View of Conflict The dominate view in the 1930s and 1940s.  Views all  conflict as harmful and must be avoided, which is simplistic  in reality.  (More often, conflict is simply suppressed to the  detriment of the organization.)
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Transitions in Conflict Thought (cont’d) Human Relations View of Conflict 2). Human Relations View of Conflict The dominate view in the mid-1940s to the  1970s.  Views conflict as a natural and inevitable outcome in  any group that can increase performance if handled  correctly.  in the 1940s to the mid-1970s.  Views  conflict as a natural and inevitable outcome  in any group that can increase performance  if handled correctly.
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Transitions in Conflict Thought (cont’d) 3). Interactionist View of Conflict Post-1970s view.  The belief that conflict is not only a  positive   force  in a group but also is  absolutely necessary  for a group to  perform effectively.   >  Distinguishes between  functional conflict  ( supports group  goals and improves performance ) and  dysfunctional   conflict   ( hinders group goals and performance ).   >   THREE TYPES  of conflict:  Task, Process, Relationship .     +   Relationship Conflict  is more likely to be  dysfunctional  than the other  types because this type of conflict is “personal.”       +  Low levels of  Process Conflict  and low-to-moderate levels of  Task  Conflict  are  functional  (as these are “cognitive” -- not personal -- in nature).
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is most prevalent in organizational America today? The Traditional View
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This note was uploaded on 06/07/2010 for the course MGMT 001 taught by Professor Mcnary during the Spring '10 term at N.C. State.

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Conflict and Negotiation1 - Conflict and Negotiation...

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