lecture_jan11_v2

lecture_jan11_v2 - Lecture 3 The past decades have seen a...

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The past decades have seen a revolution in our approach towards energy, in particular in the industrialized world - employment of energy conservation Developed nations : sustainable development can take place without irreversibly bringing about damage to our environment - not to overuse our resources Energy conservation is considered the only sensible choice to meeting the needs of a growing population, growing economy They have the technology to deal with innovation. For the developing nations, the path has to be similar even though they think are paying the price for the overuse of resources by others. Lecture 3
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US has shown that the economy can grow without a commensurate Increase in the energy consumption In the last 20 years, US GDP rose by 90 % while energy use increased By 20% “Per capita” is use per person (i.e. divide numbers by population) The above figures translate to 70 % rise in per capita GDP and a 1% decrease in per capita energy use
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In contrast, for developing countries there is a rapid increase in the per capita energy use Developing countries account for 80% of the population of the world - they consume only 1/3 of the world’s energy -this is expected to rise to 40% in the next decade - Industrial expansion, high population growth, urbanization - Rising incomes allow people to buy cars/bridges/gadgets/computers -One approach to ENERGY CONSERVATION is “technical fix” - do a task using less energy (flourescent bulbs vs. incandescent) - same light for ¼ the energy This is the principle behind INCREASED EFFICIENCY
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Energy Conservation - how to use less energy to accomplish the same task. In recent years, with spiraling demands on energy resources, and the increased cost of energy, conservation has become a major issue. Conservation is possible at all levels - government regulation and programs, manufacturing and engineering more efficient devices that use energy and by awareness and involvement by the end users (either personal or industrial)
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At the government level, you need regulations and standards, to inform and protect the consumer. The Government can also do extensive testing and research into these areas, without the economic pressure of industry. In Canada NRC and other groups are involved. Government regulation also enforces certain standards are met, and that claims by companies trying to sell a product are legitimate. (for example - R2000 homes which must be certified and you have the enerstar appliances) .
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The Government can also offer incentives to consumers to be more energy efficient and to upgrade to better energy saving devices or homes etc. . This encourages consumers to make the switch from older to newer technology. Often these upgrades can be costly, and although they pay for themselves in time, it does tend to speed up the conversion process.
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This note was uploaded on 06/07/2010 for the course NATS 1810 taught by Professor Sampabhadra during the Winter '10 term at York University.

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lecture_jan11_v2 - Lecture 3 The past decades have seen a...

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