lecture 5 CHE 1316

lecture 5 CHE 1316 - Fundamentalsofanalytical chemistry

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Fundamentals of analytical  chemistry
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Types of Analytical problems- Quantitative analysis—steps Review of chemical Stoichiometry Reaction Stoichiometry
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Anatomy of a titration curve Problem solving Volumetric Analysis
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Concentration of a solution primary standard Calculations involving volumetric-  titrimetric analysis
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Treatment of experimental  data
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Errors in chemical analysis Definitions Methods of expressing precision and  accuracy Significant figures
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Types of errors in experimental data Errors in chemical analysis Distribution of experimental data
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Statistical methods useful in  analytical chemistry
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The uses of statistics Properties of the normal (Gaussian)  curve Confidence limits
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Statistical aids in Hypothesis  testing Comparison of an experimental mean with a  true value Comparison of Averages Rejection of outliers Recommendations for the treatment of  outliers
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Statistical tests for outlier  analysis Q test T n  test
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Aqueous Solution Chemistry
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Chemical composition of  aqueous solutions Most solutes we discuss are  electrolytes form ions when dissolved in water (or  other similar solvents) This type of solution will conduct  electricity
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Chemical composition of  aqueous solutions Strong electrolytes—dissociate or ionize  completely Weak electrolytes—dissociate or ionize  only partially A weak electrolyte will be a poorer  conductor than a strong electrolyte of  equal concentration
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Chemical composition of  aqueous solutions
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Describing Acids and Bases Bronsted-Lowry definition An acid is a proton donor and  a base is a proton acceptor
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Conjugate acids and bases The species produced when an acid  gives up a proton is a potential acceptor  called the  conjugate base              acid 1       base 2  + proton  
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Conjugate acids and bases Every base produces a conjugate acid  is a result of accepting a proton       Base 2   + proton       acid 2
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Conjugate acids and bases Neutralization (acid/base) reaction is the result of combining the previous two      Acid 1  + base 2       base 1   +  acid 2 The extent to which this reaction proceeds depends on the relative  tendencies of the two bases to accept a proton      (or the acids to donate a proton)
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Acid or basic behavior of  solvents
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The conjugate acid of water is the  hydrated proton written as                       H 3 O +        this species is called the  hydronium ion  and consists of a proton covalently 
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This note was uploaded on 06/08/2010 for the course CHEM 1316 taught by Professor Rabbe during the Spring '08 term at Baylor.

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lecture 5 CHE 1316 - Fundamentalsofanalytical chemistry

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