C FAQ - C - FAQThe questions answered here are divided into...

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Unformatted text preview: C - FAQThe questions answered here are divided into several categories:1. Null Pointers2. Arrays and Pointers3. Order of Evaluation4. ANSI C5. C Preprocessor6. Variable-Length Argument Lists7. Lint8. Memory Allocation9. Structures10. Declarations11. Boolean Expressions and Variables12. Operating System Dependencies13. Stdio14. Style15. Miscellaneous (Fortran to C converters, YACC grammars, etc.)Section 1. Null Pointers1. What is this infamous null pointer, anyway?A: The language definition states that for each pointer type, there is a special value -- the "null pointer" -- which is distinguishable from all other pointer values and which is not the address of any object. That is the address-of operator & will never yield a null pointer, nor will a successful call to malloc. (malloc returns a null pointer when it fails, and this is a typical use of null pointers: as a "special" pointer value with some other meaning, usually "not allocated" or "not pointing anywhere yet.") A null pointer is conceptually different from an uninitialized pointer. A null pointer is known not to point to any object; an uninitialized pointer might point anywhere. See also questions 49, 55, and 85.As mentioned in the definition above, there is a null pointer for each pointer type, and the internal values of null pointers for different types may be different. Although programmers need not know the internal values, the compiler must always be informed which type of null pointer is required, so it can make the distinction if necessary (see below).References: K&R I Sec. 5.4 pp. 97-8; K&R II Sec. 5.4 p. 102; H&S Sec. 5.3 p. 91; ANSI Sec. 3.2.2.3 p. 38.2. How do I "get" a null pointer in my programs?A: According to the language definition, a constant 0 in a pointer context is converted into a null pointer at compile time. That is, in an initialization, assignment, or comparison when one side is a variable or expression of pointer type, the compiler can tell that a constant 0 on the other side requests a null pointer, and generate the correctly-typed null pointer value. Therefore, the following fragments are perfectly legal: char *p = 0;if(p != 0)However, an argument being passed to a function is not necessarily recognizable as a pointer context, and the compiler may not be able to tell that an unadorned 0 "means" a null pointer. For instance, the Unix system call "execl" takes a variable-length, null-pointer-terminated list of character pointer arguments. To generate a null pointer in a function call context, an explicit cast is typically required: execl("/bin/sh", "sh", "-c", "ls", (char *)0);If the (char *) cast were omitted, the compiler would not know to pass a null pointer, and would pass an integer 0 instead. (Note that many Unix manuals get this example wrong.)When function prototypes are in scope, argument passing becomes an "assignment context," and most casts may safely be omitted, since the prototype tells the compiler that a pointer is required, and of which type, enabling it to correctly cast unadorned 0's. Function prototypes cannot provide and of which type, enabling it to correctly cast unadorned 0's....
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This note was uploaded on 06/08/2010 for the course IIM CAT taught by Professor Cat during the Spring '06 term at Indian Institute Of Management, Ahmedabad.

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C FAQ - C - FAQThe questions answered here are divided into...

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