Calcium and osteoporosis

Calcium and - Calcium Osteoporosis Background Osteoporosis which means porous bones is a reduction in bone density which increases the risk for

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Background Osteoporosis, which means ”porous bones”, is a reduction in bone density, which increases the risk for fractures resulting in mild or moderate trauma. For example, a fall that would not cause a fracture in healthy bone may cause a fracture in bone that has this low density. The 3 most common places of fractures include the vertebrae, hip, and wrist. Osteoporosis has also been known as the “silent disease” because it remains masked until it reveals itself during an event. Bone density decreases as a result from inadequate calcium intake. Calcium not only strengthens bones and teeth but also has other functions; it shapes key biological proteins to activate their catalytic and mechanical properties like muscle contractions. Lead can also bind to calcium and therefore cause lead toxicity. Today 10 million individuals in the US already have osteoporosis and 34 million more have low bone mass, placing them at increased risk approximately 1.3 million people each year will suffer a bone fracture as a result of osteoporosis One out of every two women and one in eight men over 50 years of age will have an osteoporosis-related fracture in their lifetime. Osteoporosis can strike at any age 80% of those affected by osteoporosis are women and 20% are men (NIH-Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~National Resource Center) Calcium Storage You will find 99% of calcium stored in bones and teeth, the other 1% will be in the intra-and extracellullar fluids (in cells, between cells and in the blood) of the body. Keeping the Balance Calcium needs Vitamin D to be absorbed in the intestine. This is why you will always find Vitamin D added to milk. An interesting fact is that individuals may be consuming an adequate amount of calcium, but may still need to increase their Vitamin D intake. As calcium intake decreases and as calcium absorption decreases from lack of Vitamin D, the PTH (parathyroid hormone) is stimulated. The PTH is a hormone secreted by the endocrine system in response to calcium levels and acts as a feedback system. PTH promotes
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Re-absorption of calcium from the kidneys bone reabsorption activates the production of vitamin D via sunlight to increase intestinal absorption of calcium.
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This note was uploaded on 06/09/2010 for the course MFC 141 taught by Professor Horvath during the Summer '10 term at SUNY Buffalo.

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Calcium and - Calcium Osteoporosis Background Osteoporosis which means porous bones is a reduction in bone density which increases the risk for

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