rome essay 4B - 3-22-2007While the emperor Julian and...

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Unformatted text preview: 3-22-2007While the emperor Julian and Bishop Basil of Caesarea both advocated the study of classical culture, the two disagreed on what they thought classical culture actually was. Basil felt that classical Greek texts should be read for its cultural significance, while still holding onto Christian beliefs and values. Julian, however, viewed classical Greek texts as both a cultural and a religious influence.As a bishop, Basil valued Christian texts and spread the belief of his monotheistic religion. However, having studied Greek culture and classical texts in Athens (CP 151), Basil developed a great respect for classical culture. But that this pagan learning is not without usefulness (151). While Basil warned readers to not take the Greek texts to literally, he praised the ethical lessons that could be learned from them. He said to cherish and emulate the good deeds of men, but when they treat of wicked men, you ought to avoid such imitation, stopping your ears no less than Odysseus did (151). ought to avoid such imitation, stopping your ears no less than Odysseus did (151)....
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rome essay 4B - 3-22-2007While the emperor Julian and...

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