Lesson 13 - LESSON13 THETWENTIETHCENTURY;JOSEPHCONRAD...

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LESSON 13                         THE TWENTIETH CENTURY; JOSEPH CONRAD        Reading Assignment:                  Norton Anthology , pages 1683-1691; 1754-1817.        Writing Assignment:        If the increased knowledge and its consequences in the Victorian Age resulted in an age of anxiety, the ever  increasing knowledge in the Modern Age "tended only to confirm and strengthen intimations of moral unease  and to destroy faith in the essential and unquestioned rightness of Western ways of behaviour" (G.H. Bantock,  "The Social and Intellectual Background,"  The Pelican Guide to English Literature: The Modern Age  [Middlesex,  England: Penguin Books, 1961], 22.). The sense of anxiety that Matthew Arnold expressed in "Dover Beach"-- about the world which had no "certitude, nor peace, nor help for pain," where the two lovers are isolated "as on  a darkling plain / Swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight, / Where ignorant armies clash by night"--is  one of the major preoccupations of twentieth-century literature. But the confusion and uncertainty which Arnold  sensed in 1851 have become more profound. Almost relentlessly modern literature examines problems related 
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Lesson 13 - LESSON13 THETWENTIETHCENTURY;JOSEPHCONRAD...

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