Lecture 5.Jan29 - BIO 311C Spring 2010 You are responsible...

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BIO 311C Spring 2010 You are responsible for all reading assignments, even when the reading material goes beyond the lecture information. Lecture 5 – Friday 29 Jan. 2010 1
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Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum (r.e.r.) The membrane of endoplasmic reticulum is continuous with the outer membrane of the nuclear envelope. The lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum is continuous with the intermembrane space of the nuclear envelope. Rough e.r. does not appear smooth in electron micrographs as do most membranes, because of ribosomes that are attached to the cytoplasmic surface of its membranes. * From textbook, Fig. 6.12, p. 105 tubules cisternae lumen ribosomes 4 A cisterna (plural cisternae) is a flattened membrane enclosing a space.
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Ribosome Polypeptide chain being produced on a ribosome The Ribosome is the Site of Synthesis of Polypeptide Chains * polypeptide chain (each “bead” represent an amino acid) mRNA The polypeptide chain grows in length, one amino acid at a time, as the mRNA slides along the ribosome. It then folds into a 3-dimensional shape that converts it into a functional protein. (contains coded information) Proteins are polypeptide chains that have coiled and folded into a functional unit. 5
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Insertion of Polypeptide Chains into the Endoplasmic Reticulum lumen From textbook Fig. 17.21, p. 343 membrane of rough e.r. cytoplasmic matrix * 6
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Ribosomes that are attached to the endoplasmic reticulum and the outer surface of the plasma membrane are used to synthesize: some water-soluble proteins that are deposited in the intermembrane space; some water-insoluble proteins that become integral components of the membrane. * 7
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This note was uploaded on 06/11/2010 for the course BIO 48765 taught by Professor Sathasvian during the Spring '10 term at University of Texas.

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Lecture 5.Jan29 - BIO 311C Spring 2010 You are responsible...

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