Lecture 16.Mar1 - BIO 311C Spring 2010 Lecture 16 Monday 1...

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BIO 311C Spring 2010 Lecture 16 –Monday 1 March
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* backbone of Polypeptide chain R-groups of amino acids Primary Structure of a portion of a polypeptide chain Review Native conformation of a dimeric protein, cytoplasmic tubulin The native conformation of the protein illustrated here requires the correct primary structure (also called the 1° structure), secondary (2°) structure and tertiary (3°) structure of each of its two polypeptide chains. It also requires bonding between the two polypeptide chains to produce a correct quaternary (4°) structure of the protein. Each of the two polypeptide chains is called a subunit of the protein. Tubulin that is capable of assembling into a microtubule not only requires the correct conformation, but also requires another molecule, ATP, to bind to one of the two subunits. 2
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Hemoglobin is a conjugated tetrameric protein. } prosthetic group apoprotein subunits From Fig. 5.21, p. 83, of textbook * Proteins that include one or more component in addition to polypeptide chain(s) are called conjugated proteins . The polypeptide-chain portion of a conjugated protein is called an apoprotein . The non-polypeptide-chain component of a conjugated protein is called a prosthetic group . Proteins whose correct conformation and normal function do not require any prosthetic group are called simple proteins . 3
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Most Proteins can be categorized as either fibrous proteins or globular proteins. collagen, a fibrous protein hemoglobin, a globular protein Fibrous proteins are very elongated and do not have a pronounced tertiary structure. Globular proteins are folded into a rounded three-dimensional shape. * 4
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Some Ways of Classifying a Protein I. According to the number of polypeptide chains it contains A. Monomeric proteins contain only one polypeptide chain. B. Oligometric proteins contains two or more polypeptide chains. II. According to whether its structure contains components other than polypeptide chains A. Simple proteins contain nothing other than polypeptide chain(s). B. Conjugated proteins include a prosthetic group in the structure. III. According to how it folds A. Fibrous proteins remain extended such that they don't have a tertiary structure. B. Globular proteins fold into a rounded structure. * 5
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Domains of Proteins domain (binding site) for binding to a specific small molecule Lysozyme (space-filling model) A domain of a protein in its native conformation is a specific region (site) of the protein that has a defined function.
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Lecture 16.Mar1 - BIO 311C Spring 2010 Lecture 16 Monday 1...

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