web_L34_10BIO311C - BIO 311C Spring 2010 Lecture 34 Friday...

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BIO 311C Spring 2010 Lecture 34 – Friday 23 Apr. 1
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(1) DNA replication starts at a specific sequence of DNA, called the "origin of replication" site. The polynucleotide chains of the initial double helix are separated at that point. (2) DNA replication proceeds in both directions from the origin or replication, producing a replication bubble. The active site of synthesis in each direction is called the replication Y or replication fork. DNA polymerase and other proteins involved in replication function at the replication forks. Summary of DNA Replication in Prokaryotes initial double helix origin of replication replication bubble new growing polynucleotide chains replication Y = replication fork * 2 origin of replication Circular molecule of DNA
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Sequential Replication of DNA in a Prokaryote Cell with a Circular Molecule of DNA Replication starts at a specific origin of replication site A replication bubble is formed as new DNA is synthesized along each original strand. The widening bubble develops into two replication forks. New DNA is synthesized at each of the two replication forks. DNA synthesis is complete when the two replication forks meet, allowing the two DNA molecules to separate. From textbook Fig. 16.12, p. 313 3 *
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Replication of DNA in a Eukaryotic Cell with Linear Molecules of DNA Replication starts at multiple “origin of replication” sites A replication bubble is formed at each origin of replication site as new DNA is synthesized. Each widening bubble develops into two replication forks. New DNA is synthesized at each of the two replication forks. DNA synthesis is complete when adjacent replication forks meet, allowing the two DNA molecules to separate. From textbook Fig. 16.12, p. 313 4 *
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Some Proteins Involved in the Initiation of DNA Synthesis From textbook Fig. 16.13, p. 314 5 The origin of replication is here Replication bubble at the origin of replication *
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Overview of the Sequence of Events in DNA Synthesis From textbook Fig. 16.15, p. 315 Boxed area shows events in the synthesis of the leading strand. 6 3’ 3’ 5’ 5’ 3’ 5’ Polynucleotide chains in living cells are always extended in the 5’-to-3’ direction . *
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From textbook Fig. 16.15, p. 315 Synthesis of the Leading Strand During DNA Replication 7 *
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From textbook Fig. 16.16, p. 316 Synthesis of the Lagging Strand During DNA Replication 9 *
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From textbook Fig. 16.16, p. 316 DNA replication in Eukaryotic cells is very similar, but somewhat more complex. 10
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This note was uploaded on 06/11/2010 for the course BIO 48765 taught by Professor Sathasvian during the Spring '10 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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web_L34_10BIO311C - BIO 311C Spring 2010 Lecture 34 Friday...

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