02_Dry Gas Properties - Dry Gas Properties Instructional...

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Dry Gas Properties 1 Dry Gas Properties Instructional Objectives: - Reproduce the ideal gas equation of state in volume, molar volume, specific volume, or density. - Define gas compressibility factor (z-factor) and show the shape of a z-factor-pressure isotherm. - Reproduce the compressibility equation of state in volume, molar volume, specific volume, or density. - Estimate a value of z-factor from composition at a given temperature and pressure using Kay’s method. - Estimate a value of z-factor from composition at a given temperature and pressure using the more accurate Piper-McCain-Corredor method. - Define gas specific gravity. - Calculate the apparent molecular weight of a gas from its composition. - Calculate the specific gravity of a gas from its apparent molecular weight. - Define standard conditions, define standard cubic feet, and show the relationship between standard cubic feet and mass in pound moles. - Define gas formation volume factor, B g , show the typical shape of a B g versus pressure isotherm, and write the equation for calculating B g . - Define the coefficient of isothermal compressibility of a gas, c g , and show the typical shape of a c g versus pressure isotherm. - Show the typical shape of a gas viscosity versus pressure isotherm. - Discuss the relationship between viscosity units of centipoise and centistoke. - Show the typical shape of a gas density versus pressure isotherm. - List the variables required to estimate values of gas formation volume factor, gas density, gas viscosity, and the coefficient of isothermal compressibility of a gas. - Define gas-heating value and explain the meanings of gross, net, wet, and dry as used in determining values of heating value. Ideal Gases: Ideal Gas Equation of State: nRT pV = Where, n = number of moles p = pressure R = universal gas constant T = temperature V = volume The ideal gas equation of state can be written in different forms. Assumptions of Ideal Gas law: - Volume occupied by molecules is insignificant compared to volume of gas. - There are no attractive or repulsive forces between molecules. - All collisions are perfectly elastic. Mixtures of Ideal Gases: Apparent molecular weight
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Dry Gas Properties 2 j i a M y M = Where, M a = Apparent molecular weight of mixture y j = Mole fraction of component j M j = Molecular weight of component j Physical Constants: Critical Constants Compound Formula Molar Mass, molecular weight Pressure, psia Temperature, ° F Methane CH 4 16.043 666.4 -116.67 Ethane C 2 H 6 30.070 706.5 89.92 Propane C 3 H 8 44.097 616.0 206.06 Isobutane C 4 H 10 58.123 527.9 274.46 n-Butane C 4 H 10 58.123 500.6 305.62 Isopentane C 5 H 12 72.150 490.4 369.10 n-Pentane C 5 H 12 72.150 488.6 385.8 Neopentane C 5 H 12 72.150 464.0 321.13 n-Hexane C 6 H 14 86.177 436.9 453.6 2-Methylpentane C 6 H 14 86.177 436.6 435.83 3-Methylepntane C 6 H 14 86.177 453.1 448.4 Neophexane C 6 H 14 86.177 446.8 420.13 2,3-Dimethylbutane C 6 H 14 86.177 453.5 440.29 Hydrogen sulfide H 2 S 34.08 1300. 212.45 Carbon Dioxide CO 2 44.010 1071. 87.91 Nitrogen N 2 28.0134 493.1 -232.51 Argon A 39.944 704.2 -188.53 Oxygen O 2 31.999 731.4 -181.43 Example1 : Calculate Apparent Molecular Weight of Gas Mixture.
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02_Dry Gas Properties - Dry Gas Properties Instructional...

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