Native Americans and the Arrival of Europeans.pptx - AP United States History Turn your signed syllabus sheet into the bin Warm Up Algonquian society c

Native Americans and the Arrival of Europeans.pptx - AP...

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AP United States History Turn your signed syllabus sheet into the bin.
Warm Up Algonquian society, c. 1585 Part I: What can you see? Part II: What can you learn?
The Complex Societies of Native Americans (continued)
The Mound Builders: Cahokia
The Mound Builders: Cahokia Near modern-day St. Louis Over 10,000 people Capital of the Temple Mound people from c. 850 – 1150 AD Absolute monarch, the Great Sun chief Built earthen mounds as their base for homes and temples The Great Sun was on the flattened top of the Monk’s Mound, covering 16 acres, was 100 feet high, and contained 22 million cubic feet of earth, all raised by hand Other 100 smaller mounds in Cahokia
The League of Five Nations/ The Iroquois A women-controlled society: kin relations and property were inherited through the mother and each clan was presided over by “mother of the household,” the oldest woman Married men left their own clan to live in the longhouse of his wife To prevent domestic strife, it was taboo for him to speak with his mother-in-law If he was killed in war, his wife was entitled to an enemy captive as compensation; she could marry him or torture him as she chose Women part of tribe’s priesthood, the Keepers of Faith: Three Sisters Corn, Beans and Squash
The Confederacy So ferocious and bloody cycle of revenge feuds Saved from their own destruction by a Huron holy man named Deganawida, who had a vision in which he saw the Five Nations united under a Tree of Great Peace C. 1450 the Confederacy of the Iroquois was born Territory governed was envisioned as a giant longhouse that stretched from Lake Erie to Lake Champlain Brought peace, democracy and government Some posts were hereditary, but clan mothers selected fifty males to represent the clans at the Ground Council, and decisions were made by consensus. Enjoyed universal suffrage – male and female
The Buffalo Plains
The Buffalo Plains Early Plains Indians were

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