Paper 5a - Tom Marler Paper 4 Bio 110 Nov. 29, 2009 Law of...

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Tom Marler Paper 4 Bio 110 Nov. 29, 2009 Law of Segregation and Independent Assortment By understanding the law of segregation and the independent assortment theory expressed by Mendel we are able to understand genetic passage between organisms. By analyzing meiosis, monohybrid crossing and dihybrid crossing Mendel was able to prove gene blending was inconclusive. By understanding these terms and using the punnett square we can predict the phenotype of a parent cell offspring. These laws help interpret the meaning of genetics and help us understand our makeup by scientific reasoning. Gregory Mendel studied science and mathematics at the University of Vienna which contributed to his success in explaining genetics. He was the first scientist to apply mathematics to biology by incorporating probability and statists to his breeding experiments. By carefully following the scientific method he was able to accurately record his findings. His attention to detail proved very important in proving the law of segregation and the law of independent assortment. The law of segregation expressed by Mendel helps us understand that we receive our genes from our parents. This process illustrates four points: Every individual has two factors for each trait, the factors separate during the formation of the gametes, each gamete
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This note was uploaded on 06/12/2010 for the course BIO BIO 110 taught by Professor Johnhall during the Spring '10 term at Columbia College.

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Paper 5a - Tom Marler Paper 4 Bio 110 Nov. 29, 2009 Law of...

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