Handout 7 - Stable Actin Structures

Handout 7 - Stable Actin Structures - PropertiesofActin...

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Actin Cytoskeleton Properties of Actin Actin assembly Role of ATP Treadmilling Role of acting in cell movement Actin is required for movement Actin assembly can drive movement Regulation of actin assembly in cells Proteins involved in actin assembly/ disassembly Turning the protein involved in assembly and disassembly  ON and OFF Stable Actin Structures
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Actin Binding Proteins Cross-linking proteins interact with multiple actin  filaments to form bundles or networks Adaptor proteins link actin filaments to membranes
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Microvilli
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Different Types of Bundles for Different Jobs Filaments capped and relatively stable
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Red Blood Cells Spectrin  makes them “deformable” to squeeze through small capillaries.
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RBC Cytoskeleton An ordered array of springs
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RBC Actin Cytoskeleton Note : actin filaments are capped on both ends.  Spectrin held to actin by  anchor molecule. 
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ERM Family Members Link Actin Cytoskeleton to  Membrane Associated Proteins ERM  = Ezrin, Radixin, Moesin
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Lots of Protein Families Interact with Actin
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Muscle Cells and Myosin Motors Overview of Muscle Cells and Contraction -What we Know -How we Know it How Do Myosin Motors Work? -How do we know what we know? Additional Proteins and Design Features Regulation of Contraction
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Sliding Filament Model
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Muscle Structure
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EM cross-section of muscle fiber Image courtesy Dr. John Heuser, Wash. U Med. School Hexagonal  arrays of  thick and  thin  filaments Huxley, 1969                                                                                             ?
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1859 Kühne  isolated a muscle protein that he  called “myosin.”  1880: T. H. Huxley  showed that A bands were  lost after treatments which removed myosin; he  concluded that A bands were composed mainly  of myosin. 1938: Albert Szent-Györgyi
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Handout 7 - Stable Actin Structures - PropertiesofActin...

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