Handout 7 - MCB252Cells&TissuesFall2009Handout7 MCB 252...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
    Handout 7    Ha ndo ut 7 I. The Cellular Periphery and Its Role in Controlling Gene Expression II. Transcriptional Control of Gene Expression a) The Nuclear Periphery b) Nucleo-cytoplasmic Trafficking I c) Nucleo-cytoplasmic Trafficking II d) Chromosome Organization and Gene Regulation I a) Chromosome Organization and Gene Regulation II I. Translational Control of Gene Expression
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
    Handout 7 New questions: How is the expression of a gene regulated at the transcriptional  level? How is the expression of a gene regulated at the post- transcriptional level? How are mRNAs exported to the cytoplasm? What regulates protein homeostasis? II. Chromosome Organization and Gene Regulation II
Background image of page 2
    Handout 7 In eukaryotes, DNA is assembled into chromatin. Thus, to understand how transcription is modulated, we need to  study: How chromatin is structured and organized within the  nucleus. How chromatin’s structural integrity is regulated by  remodeling enzymes during gene activation and repression. II. Chromosome Organization and Gene Regulation II
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
    Handout 7 II. Chromosome Organization and Gene Regulation II
Background image of page 4
    Handout 7 II. Chromosome Organization and Gene Regulation II
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
    Handout 7 II. Chromosome Organization and Gene Regulation II
Background image of page 6
    Handout 7 II. Chromosome Organization and Gene Regulation II A typical nucleosome contains 146bp of  DNA wrapped around the histone octamer. Each octamer consists of two central H3/H4 heterodimers (which form a H3/H4 tetramer), flanked on either sides by an H2A/H2B heterodimer. Each core histone has a compact domain and a flexible N-terminal “tail” of ~30 residues.
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
    Handout 7 Each histone contains a characteristic motif termed the  “histone fold”. The histones insert arginines into  all the minor grooves facing the  surface of the octamer. These  contacts provide most of the  energy driving the DNA-octamer  interactions. II. Chromosome Organization and Gene Regulation II
Background image of page 8
    Handout 7 Histone Modifications II. Chromosome Organization and Gene Regulation II
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
    Handout 7 The tails are also believed to stabilize intra- and internucleosomal DNA interaction. For example, the H4 tail interact with the H2A/H2B interface of an
Background image of page 10
Image of page 11
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 39

Handout 7 - MCB252Cells&TissuesFall2009Handout7 MCB 252...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 11. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online