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Lecture #4 - • Civil Rights Movement Challenges Faced by...

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10/7/08 Lecture #4 Histories and Patterns of Immigration in the US Immigration in the US: A brief History Early 17 th – 20 th Century: Predominantly European Americans o First 2 centuries: Immigrants from Britain, other Western and Northern European countries o From 1890 – 1910: Drastic increase of immigrants from Southern and Eastern Europe After 1930- Decreasing numbers of immigrants After 1965: “New Immigrants” from Asia and Latin America Why the changing trends of immigration in the United States? Changing US immigration policies Changing social conditions in the US Different Acts- In written notes Social Conditions 1. Scientific Conditions Increase in immigrants from Southern and Eastern Europe WWI The Great Depression 2. Labor shortages in the IS Europe no longer sent immigrants The Demand met by Latin America immigrants 3. Americas involvement in WWII and Vietnam War Humanitarian concerns o Victims of war or political persecution
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Unformatted text preview: • Civil Rights Movement Challenges Faced by the “Old” and “New” immigrants OLD (Classic Period) NEW (After 1970)-Different trip to US-Difficult trip to US-Cultural Barriers -Immigration bureaucracy &-Hostility on Jobs restrictions-Physically Demanding Jobs-Racism-Immigration in Poverty-Physically Demanding Jobs-Living in Poverty-Exploitation-Living in Poverty Assimilation for “Old” and “New” Immigrants (Massey’s Theory)-Historical Conditions favoring assimilation-Historical Conditions slowing down -The long hiatus assimilation -Economic boom in the US -Continued Immigration from -Inter-marriage, mixed residence sending countries 10/7/08 Lecture #4-Economic upward mobility-Segmented Labor Market-Assimilation still took generations-Immigrants slow upward mobility-Ethnic Europeans became “White”-Assimilation as 2-way streets...
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