Ch5 - IPv4 Addresses If we all did the things we are...

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Chapter 5 1 IPv4 Addresses “If we all did the things we are capable of doing, we would literally astound ourselves” - Thomas Alva Edison, 1847-1931
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Chapter 5 2 Objectives Recognize and describe the various IP address classes from A to E, and explain how they’re composed and used Define the terms subnet and supernet , and apply subnetting and supernetting concepts in solving specific network design problems Describe the IPv4 address limitations, and how techniques like Classless addresses and use of private IP addresses with Network Address Translation (NAT) can ease those limitations
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Chapter 5 3 Different Types of Addresses Different addressing schemes: Symbolic (eg: www.bcit.ca) Logical (eg: 172.16.1.10) Physical (eg: 6 byte MAC addresses) Symbolic addresses are easier to remember than logical addresses such as 199.95.72.8 Physical addresses are associated with the Data Link layer (of the OSI Reference model). Their size and format vary depending on the physical network. Eg: MAC layer addresses in an Ethernet Logical addresses are associated with the Network layer. They are independent of the underlying physical network. Eg: IP addresses
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Chapter 5 4 IP Addresses IPv4 uses 32-bit addresses, commonly represented in dotted decimal notation. Eg: 11000000 00001100 00001010 00000101 (in binary) 192 12 10 5 (each octet in decimal) Written as: 192.12.10.5 (in dotted decimal notation) Classful Addresses Address space is divided into 5 classes (A to E) Only Class A, B & C addresses are assigned to hosts Each host address has two parts : Network address (Network id) and Host address (Host id) A two-level hierarchy All hosts in a given network has the same Network Id , with each host having a unique Host Id .
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Chapter 5 5 Net id Host id (24 bits) Class A 1 Net id Host id (16 bits) Class B 0 1 Net id Host id (8 bits) Class C 0 1 1 Multicast group id Class D 0 1 1 1 Reserved for future use Class E 1 1 1 Classful Addresses 0
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Chapter 5 6 Address ranges for different classes Class Range A 0.0.0.0 to 127.255.255.255 B 128.0.0.0 to 191.255.255.255 C 192.0.0.0 to 223.255.255.255 D 224.0.0.0 to 239.255.255.255 E 240.0.0.0 to 255.255.255.255
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Chapter 5 7 Classful Addresses Class A – for extremely large networks Each network can support 16,777,214 hosts (2^24 - 2) Address range 0.x.x.x (x: 0-255) is not assigned to networks Address range 10.x.x.x (x: 0-255) is reserved for private network use (as per RFC 1918) 127.x.x.x (x: 0-255) is reserved for loopback testing Only ~125 Class A networks are possible
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Chapter 5 8 Classful Addresses Class B - for moderate to large (mid-size) networks 16,384 Class B networks are possible Each Class B network can support 65,534 hosts (2^16 - 2) Address range 172.16.0.0 to 172.31.255.255 is reserved for private use Class C - for small networks Over 2 million Class C networks are possible Each Class C network can support 254 hosts (2^8 - 2) Address range 192.168.0.0 -192.168.255.255 is reserved for private use
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Chapter 5 9 Types of Addresses Unicast : data sent to a single host (or, an interface on a machine) Broadcast : sent to all hosts on a network Directed broadcast - host id with all 1’s Eg: A packet sent to 190.10.255.255 is received by
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This note was uploaded on 06/13/2010 for the course CITX CITX 1150 taught by Professor P.whalen during the Fall '09 term at British Columbia Institute of Technology.

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Ch5 - IPv4 Addresses If we all did the things we are...

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