Ch11 - Unicast Routing Protocols There isnt a person...

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Chapter 11 1 Unicast Routing Protocols There isn’t a person anywhere that isn’t capable of doing more than he thinks he can. - Henry Ford
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Chapter 11 2 Objectives List advantages and disadvantages of routing protocols Describe how routing tables are dynamically built up in a router Explain how routing protocols can be categorized as interior and exterior routing protocols Describe how routing loops can occur and techniques used for minimizing them Describe basic features of RIP, OSPF and BGP
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Chapter 11 3 Advantages & Disadvantages of Routing Protocols Compared to manual configuration, much easier to maintain in large networks Represent a point of failure that attackers can exploit Can take some time for a router on one side of a large network to learn about a topology change on the other side of the network Advanced routing protocols can be very complex Inherent lack of control. For eg: if there are multiple paths to a destination network, routing protocol will decide which one to use. While metrics can be manually tweaked to make one path preferred, one needs to understand the consequences of the manual changes
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Chapter 11 4 Routing Domains and Autonomous Systems A routing domain is a group of routers under the control of a single administrative entity, running a common interior routing protocol. An autonomous system consists of a collection of routers under the control of a single administrative entity - for example, all the routers belonging to a particular ISP, corporation or university. An autonomous system can choose one or more routing protocols to run within the autonomous system, but typically may use only a single interior routing protocol.
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Chapter 11 5 Grouping Routing Protocols Routed or Routable protocols (in contrast to Routing protocols ) are Layer 3 protocols used to carry application data through an internetwork (Eg: IP). Routed protocols use information in routing tables built up by routing protocols for forwarding packets to their destinations Intra- and Inter-domain routing protocols Intra-domain (or, interior) routing protocols are used inside an autonomous system. They are also called interior gateway protocols ”. E.g : RIP, OSPF Inter-domain (or, exterior) routing protocols are used between autonomous systems. They are also called exterior gateway protocols ”. E.g: BGP (Border Gateway Protocol)
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Chapter 11 6 Figure 11.1 Autonomous systems
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Chapter 11 7 Figure 11.2 Grouping routing protocols
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Chapter 11 8 Distance Vector Routing Protocols In distance vector routing, the least cost route between any two routers is the route with minimum distance. Each router maintains a vector (table) of minimum distances to other nodes. The minimum distance (called the “
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Ch11 - Unicast Routing Protocols There isnt a person...

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