FDST410Lectures10-18 - FOOD SCIENCE 4010Lecture 10...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Spring 2010 FOOD SCIENCE 4010--Lecture 10 Fermentation and enzyme technology PRINCIPLES: Starter cultures are used to provide a controlled fermentation. Genetic modification can improve effectiveness of yeast fermentations. Continuous cultures are provided a continuous supply of additional substrate  with a balanced removal of product biomass. Proteases are the commercial enzymes produced in the largest volume  Immobilized enzymes perform many crucial functions in food processing.  Food Processing Technology  Chapter 7 DISCUSSION QUESTIONS: 1. List and describe the factors that affect the growth and activity of microbes in  food fermentations. 2. Compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of batch and  continuous cultures.  3. Describe the process of vegetable fermentation. How does this differ from  other types of fermentations? 4. Why has there been rapid growth in the use of enzymes in processing  applications in recent years? What are the main advantages in using  enzymes over chemical modification in food processes?
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
5. What does the enzyme stachyase do? What types of foods would benefit  from this enzyme?
Background image of page 2
FOOD SCIENCE 4010--Lecture 11 Irradiation PRINCIPLES: Food irradiation can be used as a preservation technique or a unit operation.  Food irradiation induces free radicals.  Radiation dose depends on the sensitivity of the item irradiated and the  resistance of microbes present. Radiation can penetrate some packaging thus eliminating post-processing  contamination.  Food companies are reluctant to use food irradiation.  Food Processing Technology Chapter  8 DISCUSSION QUESTIONS: 1. What concerns have been raised about food irradiation? Which of these  concerns should be considered seriously? 2. How is radiation dose measured? How do you decide what dose to use in  irradiating a food product? 3. How does the size of a microbe affect the dose required to inactivate it? How  susceptible are viruses to irradiation? 4.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 06/15/2010 for the course FDST 4080 taught by Professor Pegg during the Spring '10 term at University of Georgia Athens.

Page1 / 16

FDST410Lectures10-18 - FOOD SCIENCE 4010Lecture 10...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online