Lab 4 Bread - John Goodson 10/19/2009 FDST 4050 Effect of...

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John Goodson 10/19/2009 FDST 4050 Effect of Amylase on Bread Structural and Mechanical Properties Introduction In the process of bread production, the baking of dough causes the transformation into the recognizable final product seen and eaten by consumers. The most apparent changes during baking are volume expansion, crust formation, inactivation of yeast and enzymatic activities, protein cross-linking, and partial gelatinization of starch. Bread, by itself, has a very short shelf life before staling and becoming of unacceptable quality for consumption. In order to combat this problem and lengthen the shelf-life of the bread, many processors add enzymes such as amylase, which can improve the textural quality of bread and extend its shelf life. α-Amylases, which randomly hydrolyze the a-1,4 glucosidic linkages in starch, results in short chains of low- molecular weight polysaccharides. α-Amylase activity in dough systems and during baking impacts several product characteristics, including bread volume, firmness, and firming rate (Lagrain, Leman et al. 2008). The antistaling effect of this enzyme has been attributed to its ability to produce low-molecular weight dextrins that interfere with starch retrogradation and
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Lab 4 Bread - John Goodson 10/19/2009 FDST 4050 Effect of...

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