collards - Frozen Collard Greens John Goodson Click to edit...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 6/17/10 Frozen Collard Greens John Goodson
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6/17/10 Collard Green Origins Cultivar of Wild Cabbage From eastern Mediterranean and brought to the US by Africans that arrived in Jamestown, VI in the early 1600s Grown mainly in Brazil, Portugal, the Southern US, parts of Africa, Montenegro, Spain and Kashmir Varieties include Georgia Southern, Morris Heading, Butter Collard, and Portuguese Kale Name derived from Anglo-Saxon coleworts or
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6/17/10 Collard Green Facts Traditionally eaten on New Year's Day to ensure wealth in the coming year, as the leaves resemble green-back dollars Taste considered much better after first frost Juices from the cooked greens known as “pot likker” is highly nutritious and flavorful Can be thinly sliced and fermented to make collard kraut, which is often cooked with flat dumplings
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6/17/10 Nutrition Rich in fiber, vitamin C, and calcium with low phosphorous Potent anti-viral, anti-bacterial and anti-cancer
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This note was uploaded on 06/15/2010 for the course FDST 4080 taught by Professor Pegg during the Spring '10 term at University of Georgia Athens.

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collards - Frozen Collard Greens John Goodson Click to edit...

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