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Lab 3 - Psychology of Perception Psychology 4165 Spring...

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Psychology of Perception Psychology 4165, Spring 2008 Laboratory 3 Hue-Naming Functions
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Hue-Naming Functions - 2 - Laboratory 3: Hue-Naming Functions This laboratory is meant to explore the variability in pure color perception. Perceived color (or hue) is determined by the wavelength of the light, ranging from 380nm to 780nm for human perception. Light itself has no color; the hues we experience are merely the response of the visual system to luminous stimulation. While there are hundreds of different color names, human color vision is composed of only two channels; one of either red and green and one of blue or yellow. Almost all colors can be described as a combination of these two ranges. In this experiment participants viewed monochromatic lights and classified them by their composition in an attempt to model this process. These functions were then compared with subjective “pure colors,” wavelengths that are described by only one of the two color channels. Only the blue, green, and yellow functions have pure color wavelengths, as the theoretical yellow-blue process has no zero point in the red color range. The hypotheses to be tested are (1) that the pure color wavelengths correspond to the zero points on the two color process functions, as well as (2) that gender has no effect on color perception. Method Participants The participants of this experiment were the twenty-nine members of the PSYC 4165 Spring 2008 lab section 2. They are of mixed gender, and generally around the age of twenty.
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Hue-Naming Functions - 3 - Materials A Bausch and Lomb monochrometer was used to produce monochromatic light.
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